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KINDLY DONATED BY BRIAN AND NORMA LEAN

brianlean at sky.com

 

THE YELLAND FAMILY

of

St. Stephen-in-Brannel

and America

1904-1919

 

A collection of letters written to Richard Rowett Yelland

by his family

after he emigrated to America,

and other related documents.

 

 

(The original letters and documents were preserved by

Richard Yelland's daughter, Mary, and at her request have been placed in the

Cornwall County Records Office, Truro.)

                                                                                           

                                                                                                           Brian Lean, July 2004

 

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Editor's Note

 

When I was asked by Mary Allen (nee Yelland) of Lawrence, Kansas, if I would be happy to receive a collection of letters based mainly on a long-running family correspondence between members of the Yelland family of St. Stephen-in-Brannel and Richard Rowett Yelland who emigrated to America in 1904, I was delighted to co-operate. I little realised at that stage just how involved I would become with our family history and the lifestyle of those living in Cornwall in the early years of the twentieth century.

I decided to transcribe these letters into this printed format because the handwriting in many of the originals is very difficult to decipher. However, I have tried to retain the original spelling and punctuation as far as possible. For those who care to read the original letters or the document I have produced, I should mention that Mary, who sent these letters to me, is the daughter of Richard Yelland and the same "little maid Mary" referred to so many times in the letters contained in these pages. At the time of the production of this document, summer 2004, Mary is 93 years of age.

This document has been compiled by Brian Lean, great grandson of Charles and Charlotte Yelland and grandson of Sydney and Mary Lean.

 

 

 

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Background to the book.

 

This booklet tells the true story of Richard (Dick) Yelland who emigrated to America in 1904 from his parents' home at 1, Saw Mill Terrace, St. Stephen. Here, his father, Charles Yelland, ran a steam saw mill business which was originally situated along the lane behind the house.

Dick set sail for America in April 1904 on the S. S. St. Louis, stopping en route at Cherbourg, France, and that is why his mother, Charlotte, in her first letter, refers to having received a postcard from him from Cherbourg.

A week later Dick entered America via the immigration centre at Ellis Island, New York, and immediately went to stay with a cousin, James Dabb, in New Jersey on America's east coast. It was intended that he would only stay there for a while before travelling right across America to Stockton, California where, at first, he was to stay with his father's sister, Aunt Ellen Tretheway, before finding work and settling there. This explains the letter from his aunt telling him that she and her family will make him welcome when he arrives. However, Dick never did go to California, choosing instead to stay in New Jersey where he at first found work in a factory after which he gained entrance to the Drew Theological Seminary in Madison, New Jersey, where he spent four years training to become a Methodist minister.

He graduated from the seminary in 1908 and the following year, while acting as minister at a church in New Virginia, Iowa, he met and married Fannie Evans. A year later a daughter, Mary Charlotte was born (now Mary Yelland Allen, aged 93, and living in Kansas). We understand that there was a brief period of great happiness in the Yelland household but sadly, within a couple of years, Dick contracted T.B. and died in Espanola, New Mexico in 1914 just before his thirty-seventh birthday. His little daughter, Mary Charlotte was just three and a half years old.

Throughout Dick's time in America he and his mother, Charlotte Yelland, exchanged weekly letters and many of Charlotte's letters, written from 1, Saw Mill Terrace, St. Stephen, have been preserved by Dick's daughter, Mary Yelland Allen, and now provide the basis for this book. Many of these letters are over one hundred years old.

Almost from the start the reader will be able to pick up hints that all was not well between Charlotte Yelland and her husband, Charles; that he had strange moods, was selfish, unkind and verbally cruel to her and often kept her short of money. Both Dick and his married sister, Mary Lean (who lived at 1, Chapel Terrace, Coombe) were well aware of their father's behaviour towards their mother and so when Dick wrote to his mother he often sent his letters to his sister's address at Coombe so that his father wouldn't see them. When she had read them Charlotte often burned them. In particular Dick didn't want his father to know that his mother sometimes sent him money nor that he later sent her money, as he knew that his father would seize it for himself and spend it.

It soon becomes apparent that Charles Yelland couldn't get on with anyone, especially his son-in-law, Sydney Lean, and that he loved no-one but himself. I won't reveal what eventually happened to the saintly Charlotte except to say that there was a very sad and tragic end to her life after enduring many years in a loveless and unhappy marriage.

After Charlotte Yelland's death her daughter, Mary Lean, assumed the task of writing to her brother, Dick, and these letters are contained in the second section of the book along with copies of many other related documents including birth, marriage and death certificates.

Of course, this story relates specifically to my own family; Charles and Charlotte Yelland were my great grandparents and Mary and Sydney Lean of Coombe were my grandparents. However, I do hope the reader will still find it interesting as the letters contain many references to St. Stephen, Coombe and other neighbouring villages, together with old photographs of the area. The letters also provide a keen insight into Cornish village life (the happy times and the hardships) at the turn of the last century.

The original letters and documents are now at the Cornwall County Records Office at Truro where they are available for public viewing on request.

Brian Lean 2004

 

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Contents

 

AFTER YOU HAVE CLICKED ON A LINK, USE THE

BROWSER BACK BUTTON TO RETURN TO WHERE YOU WERE

 

 

Letters written to Richard Yelland by his mother, Charlotte Yelland, and his aunt, Ellen Tretheway 1904-1910

 

Letter written to Richard Yelland by his father, Charles Yelland 1911

 

Letters written to Richard Yelland by his sister, Mary Grace Lean, his aunt, Elizabeth Parkin and his cousin, Samuel Martyn 1911-1919

 

Appendix

 

A record of Richard Yelland's bicycle ride from St. Stephens to London and beyond 1899

 

A School Board Reference for Richard Yelland

 

Charles Yelland's will

 

Documents relating to the death of Charles Yelland

 

Mary Lean's receipts for repayments on a loan to Richard Yelland

 

Invitation to Richard to spend Christmas with James Dabbs and family 1904

 

Translation of Richard Yelland' s shorthand notes

 

Certificates

 

Other letters written by some of Richard’s ancestors

Letter written in 1832 by John Yelland, born 1770, and his daughter Catherine

Letter written in 1836 by Richy Yelland, born 1765 (a brother of John Yelland)

Letter written in 1840 by Eleanor Yelland (a daughter of John Yelland)

Letter written in 1851 by Richard Yelland (a son of John Yelland)

 

===============================

 

This is a copy of Richard Yelland's cabin assignment label

on the Southampton to New York Line in 1904.

 

The original is in the possession of Martha Sawyer Allen, one of Richard's

granddaughters.

 

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Richard travelled to America on the S. S. St. Louis. This is a copy of a list of immigrants carried on the ship on its voyage from Southampton (via Cherbourg) to New York, the date of departure being April 16th and the date of arrival in New York, April 23rd. Richard is number 5 on the list which records his occupation as "preacher" and his intended destination as Stockton, California. The column on the far right records that he had an artificial leg.

 

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Letters written to Richard Yelland by his mother, Charlotte Yelland,

and his aunt, Ellen Tretheway 1904 -1910

 

Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens C. T.

April 19th 1904

Dear Dick

The two letters I am sending came this afternoon, tell me when you write what they were about.

Your Post Cards came on Saturday all right and one from Cherbourg on Monday. I was very glad to get them. I do hope you will get on.

I have that note you sent to Mary with the key.

I should like to look in on you sometimes if I could.

Things are going on quiet home here thus far. God bless you.

From your loving Mother

Charlotte Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens C. T.

May 9th 1904

My dear Son

Your letter of the 28th came this morning it has taken rather a long time to come. I had been thinking about you all the morning scarcely hoping to hear today. I was glad to see your hand writing when I answered the postman's knock.

I should have written to you before had I known that you would be at N. J. so long. I feel so much obliged to our friends there for treating you so kindly.

I am very much cheered to know that you have found a chapel and meetings just like they are in old Cornwall. Follow them up my son they will do you good and help to keep you in the right path.

I went to chapel the Tuesday night after you left home.

Mr. Pearce preached he prayed very nicely for you also for the "home" you had just left he told me he had received a Post Card from you. That same evening I posted two letters for you. They will reach Stockton before you. I think it was very good of Aunt Ellen to write to you at N. J. it looks as if they intend to make you welcome. I do hope your health will be good and that you will find something to do that you can get on with. Father received a letter from Aunt Ellen a few days after you left home. Said she thought you were doing a wise thing by coming to Stockton. Has Mr. Dabb received that book father sent him?

I dare say you wonder sometimes how we are getting on home here it seems a long time since I saw you, we are moving on pretty quiet thus far, I don't expect great things it will help very much to know that you are all right.

My chilblains are not well yet, people don't seem to get them much where you are. They have needs to be thankful for! I am sure if they had them once they would dread them very much. Rug, overcoat and lump of camphor all come useful. Thought they would.

Father is busy can't stay to write this time he says. Another load of boxes going to Wadebridge

tomorrow.

That letter you posted to father while on board I had to pay 5d on, one stamp was not enough. The postcard you sent to Mrs. Searle you only put half penny stamp. I tell you these things so that you may mind in the future.

The other day when Blanche was here she was told not to go outside the gate, when I went back to the door she was out looking down the road, she said I am looking to see if Uncle Dick is coming. If I forget to tell you things sometimes you must remind me again. Father sends his love.

From your ever loving Mother

C.Y.

Give our kindest love and thanks to our friends at N. J.

 

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Church Town

May 16th 1904

Dear Dick

I thought I would write your Aunt a few lines and enclose a line to you.

We received a letter from you last Monday 9th I wrote by return. I am sending this one to Stockton now so that you may hear from home perhaps as soon as you get there.

Father is gone to the woods to day. We are going on pretty quiet thus far. Saw Miss Curner and Annie Broad last evening, they wished to be remembered to you. Sam Goudge and Fred Varcoe I saw both of them. Mary and the children are very well they were up to see last week. My hands are not well yet but getting better.

We are having a very cold spring with wind. I hope it won't blow off the blossom from the trees

too soon. .

From Your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Sawmill Terrace

C. T.

May 26th 1904

Dear Dick

Your letter of the 9th to father came on Friday last. Also Mary, with one enclosed for me. I did not expect any money sent so soon. Still I am glad to have some as I am very short. I asked father for a little back at Xmas but there is nothing yet. £6 not £7 I lent you. I shall be so thankful if you can get on where you are, it seems to me you are not so far from home now, I shall be glad to know how much you are getting after a while, you may get on to something better by and by in the same place. I don't think it's a bad start. I do hope your health will be good. I think the Dabbs are good to you, also Mr. Quick, he is a Master there you say. I thought to myself weeks ago that you never would be stopping there so long with out some reason it's a good thing you have no stairs to climb, no heavy work and the saw well guarded. I shall be glad for you to tell father about the saw.

You have comfortable lodgings you say, I'm so glad, I do hope you will be able to manage with the food. You don't care much for pork, get a little something sometimes that you like, don't go short. Do you mean that you have breakfast at 6 o'clock? What time do you go to your work: and when do you leave off? Meat sandwiches for dinner, don't you go to your lodgings dinner time? Fruit is good for you get all you can. Supper from 6 to 7 suppose they think there is nothing more required before going to bed, don't go short. Can you have it quiet to yourself evenings when you want to? Do you attend the chapel with Mr. Dabb and family? My chilblains are much better. My eyes feel very weak the last two or three weeks, hope they will soon be better.

Yesterday "Whit Wednesday" the Christian endeavour went away they had fine weather. You must excuse all mistakes.

I drempt one night this week that you came home just for a day or so to see about the typewriter. I thought you were going to take it with you, have you heard from F. Varcoe yet anything about it?

You do not do much to shorthand now I suppose?

27th

A newspaper came to father on Monday last we were glad to receive it, I am glad it was addressed to him, he thinks a great deal of anything like that, you know he is childish. Perhaps

 

Sam Goudge will be writing you about the Christian endeavour trip.

Mary is here again to day with the children.

Father is not gone to town this afternoon busy sawing. Curra is here working.

Mr. Morcom on Monday asked to be remembered to you. People often ask when I heard from you. Mary joins me in love, father sends his love, too busy to write this time.

From your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

Charles and Charlotte Yelland

Undated photographs

 

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St.Stephen’s Church Town

The village where Charles and Charlotte Yelland

ran their saw mill business

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

Invoice used by Charles Yelland

in his business at the Steam Saw Mills, St.Stephen

 

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A postcard of St.Stephen’s Church Town

at the time Charles and Charlotte Yelland were living in the village.

It was posted in the village post office in 1906.

                                         The writer asks:

                                         Do you recognise the policeman’s wife in the doorway?  This is the lower part of the village.

                                         Edith

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

Chapel Road, St.Stephen then . . .

 

. . .and now (2006)

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

C.T.

May 30th 1904

My dear Dick

I do hope you are having my letters by this time.

A Post Card for father this morning, it does me good to see your handwriting.

Your letter to Mary for me I received last Saturday I was delighted to get such a nice long letter. I scarcely know how to tell you what you may eat and drink, fruit is good, I am glad you get that it will help to keep your bowels right. I don't think meat is binding, milk take as much as you like, vegetables are relaxing, I believe soft sugar is more relaxing than lump but I do not think the sugar you make use of will hurt you, quaker oats is all right if you like it, Doctor Broadway used to say he did not think he had a proper breakfast without quaker oats. I am glad you sometimes get eggs.

It does me so much good to hear you say you feel well and strong, a bath twice a week will help you. Changing shirt and flannel in the evening I believe is all good for the health as long as you don't put it on in the morning feeling damp and cold. It's very good of Mrs. Dabb to do your washing and mending, she is kind. If you have got that silk handkerchief I told you to get for Aunt

A. E., or the gloves for Aunt Ellen, I think I would give some of it to Mrs. Dabb. I don't think I need remind you, you know what to do in that way.

Fruit is just the same price as it is here. I expect apples will be cheap with you by and by, oranges and apples are excellent for keeping the bowels right. Beecham' s pills are good to take sometimes just one to help keep you right if it's required, they are mild better than Senna.

I hope you are able to make a good meal in the evening. Many people say supper just before going to bed is not good, suitable fruit will help you.

I am so thankful that reading the Bible is a comfort to you you cannot value it too highly nor prize it too much. Stick to the one thing needful and it will help you in every way.

I could not help shedding tears of joy when I read your letter to know that my influence had helped you. I know my dear son we shall meet again in heaven if not on earth. I feel some how like one to my self it seems to me I have never done much good in the world, all have not the gift, yet I feel as though I want to do something for the "Master". A starless crown is not so well. I do

feel peaceful within from day to day but my faith is so weak at times.

I do hope the people at the church will be very friendly and comfortable with you. I am glad you get on with them so well. Their time of service is not like ours. You find the pastor very nice I dare say.

There are plenty of ways to do good if you do not go in for the Ministry. It may be better for you to stick to what you are about, as the pastor told you, pray for guidance, we must do that all the time whatever we are engaged in if we wish to succeed. Six years is a long time to look forward to. I do trust God will lead you to the work you are best fitted for and He will if you trust

in Him.

I will let Aunt Lizzie and Aunt Higman know how you are getting on. I know you can't write them all. Arthur is going on all right now I believe also Frank. I am glad you had the 4/- from Dixon. Too bad of Aunt H not to give you any thing. Father is pretty good sometimes he can't be always good you know, he is gone away for timber today so I thought I would write now I have it all to myself, some of your letters I shall burn. I don't want him to get hold of them, others Mary can keep for me. Father is always glad to hear from you, he says you would not get on in America if you had not a friend to get you in to something, he must talk like that. I am thankful you are getting so much as you are, I don't care whether you tell me or not the exact amount. I think with the "porter" it's providential that you have got into Singers and Mr. Dabb thinks you are fortunate so stick to it and I hope the time will come when you can have a nice little home of your own. Is house rent very high? I hope the bicycle you have is safe. I am so glad for you to ride to work. I don't wish you to say anything to Mr. D about father let it go, never mind if he doesn't speak of me. The order to Mary for me is all right. I have not fully answered your letter now. More soon.

From your ever loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

708 N. Union St.

Stockton

June 1st 1904

My dear Nephew

Yesterday I received a letter from your Mother, dated May 16th. She said that you had left Home before my last letter reached there. She sent a note in my letter for you. I will enclose it in this letter.

I hope you are well. Walter and your Uncle are at work, we are all well.

Now when you come here it will not cost you any thing for Board and Lodging, not until you get work, so do not trouble about it and as I told you when I wrote last that if you needed money to come to California we will send you money, only let us know how much you want, and we will make you welcome, when you arrive and if we know when to expect you some of your relatives will be at the depot to meet you. If you come, and should not meet anyone there, come to 708 N. Union St.

Ellen and Adilaid Yelland was here on Monday, and your Uncle Walter came over in the evening. They are all well, they ask about you and wanted to know how long before you would be here.

It is Hay Season but we have beautiful weather, to save the Hay. I will tell you the news when you come. Alice gave the letter you sent to the Principle of the Collage, but he said that it was a little late, but he said that you would have no trouble to get a job - (but to get it you must come.) We will all do the best we can for you.

I will close for the presant.

With love from your Aff Aunt Ellen Tretheway.

PS Remember me kindly to cousin James Dabb and family. I hope they are well. Excuse all mistakes written in haste.

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

1 Sawmill Terrace

July 16th 1904

My dear Dick

Yours of the 4th came yesterday it was welcome for I was anxiously watching the post, when I saw him outside. I said have you anything for me he said yes I have the letter you want I expect. Sent away a paper with a post card to you yesterday. So Dick you are having a holiday never mind if there is not any pay it will do you good. I suppose some of the people there are having a fine time. I would rather go to bed at night. I think you will see some strange sights I dare say as you move about the world, it seems to me to be a pity that so much money should be spent about such things yet it's good for trade I dare say. Of course they must stop work sometimes at the factory for repairs, in the meantime you can be doing some good for yourself. I know you will not be idle. I hope when the election comes off that the right party will win that times will be better all through America. I should like to see the factory, what a number of hands they employ, over six thousand you say, yet you are not crowded, those little railway engines running round the yard and steamboats to and from New York, what expense. I will try to send you a paper often. I am glad you have had letters from S. Goudge and F. Varcoe. I think they will be pleased for you to go into the Ministry. We have had some pretty good weather lately for our country, we had a thunder storm the other night. I believe there is a plenty of work at the clay

works now, I don't hear any complaints, we are not selling much for weeks past the yard is almost forsaken seems to me. I hope it will take a turn again soon. Father is in the yard again most of the day now but he is not very strong yet I want him to keep on a few years longer if it's God's will, since he has been so poorly he speaks kinder to me, he has told me more than once how good I have been to him to nurse him so, I know I have done what I could.

Arthur and Catherine are going on just the same not married yet Aida and her shop are doing all right I should think, she enquires for you. I suppose Joe is doing fairly well in the egg business. They appear to be able to have all they want, his wife is much better in health he says able to do her work he seems so glad. I think they are very comfortable together. Morcom is going on as usual. Ernie still gets a good many boxes of us but Visick is sending so many that is the trouble but we can do nothing by it. I believe Vage is all right but he has not been here since you left home. We often see Mr. Huthridge he was very kind the other day when father was so poorly, said he could come in in the night if I wanted anything, said knock the wall and I shall hear you, came

in of an evening and sat with him for a long time, his mother is very friendly as well. Things in the garden are not so good as I should like, not many gooseberries, a few raspberries and currants. I do hope you are enjoying the fruit I believe tomatoes are good to eat if one likes them, perhaps they will be cheap soon. If you have not Christian Endeavour meetings for a time you will find some sort of meetings to attend I expect, the Vesper services I don't quite understand what they are like dare say it's very good.

You ask me about that £50 to Mary, be quite easy about that Dick, you have nothing to pay her she would not think of such a thing now. You know there is £150 in the yard of my money if you remained in the business and prospered I thought it only fair for Mary to have something, things are altered you have not got to give her anything. I used to think how nice that little money would be for me if I get so that I can't work but I'm afraid it's quite lost to me. I suppose I must try not to look on the dark side for I never have wanted necessaries yet I am thankful to say still I should have had some things that I have done without because money was scarce. Now I think you had better keep my money for the time you can't tell what you may need. I am not sorry you sent me some a few weeks since because I am having some things for myself that I want, of course I told father you had sent me a little money, I did not say how much, he said it's no disgrace for a son to send his mother a present, he has nothing for me, now I can get little things I need.

Your letter to Mary with photos came to her same day yours came here. She brought it to me the same day, photos are nice. I am keeping the one with the book before you, both very good, it seems almost as if you were here when I look at it, you are not gone to look any thinner you make a good photo.

I think I have sent you some long letters since you left us, I don't say they will always be so long, you see I have not so much to do now you are gone so have more time for writing. Dear Dick I can't fully answer your letter this time, the paper won't hold out and if I use more it might be too heavy for one stamp. Will write again in a few days if I can. I keep fairly well, father is

better, gone to Treworthenick today, I don't know how he will get on he is not strong, he told Curra last week if Dick had only stopped home and worked on comfortable with him how different things might be. I am glad for your sake you went when you did. I hope you will be able to enter the Ministry and succeed. I believe if we put our trust in God he will see us through. I don't think Blanche will ever forget you, as soon as she saw your photo she said Uncle Dick, no one told her, she is a very sharp child. Frank is all there too. I do love him, he can say egg. . . .

[The final pages of Charlotte's letter are lost]

 

Richard Yelland

Charlotte Yelland referred to these photographs in the above letter.

Of the two she seemed to prefer the one with Richard and the book

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

1 Saw Mill Terrace

       Church Town

       July 21st 1904

Dear Dick

I am going to answer your last letter now if I can, I know you are glad to get a letter often, father doesn't know always when I write, says he can't write often for he can't tell what to write to you. Perhaps Mary will be sending a few lines soon but you know she has a plenty to do. I saw John Searle last Saturday he said he had got your photo he seems pleased. The reason they have not answered your letter is because they have been busy papering and house cleaning and Mrs. Searle is not very strong at the best I suppose you have sent one to "Lizzie." I look at yours very often, it's such a comfort to take it in my hand and have a good look. Yes Dick you have a true and constant friend in your Mother. I have not forgotten the quiet times we used to spend together. I can tell you it was a pleasure for me to get you nice little things for your dinner or supper when I had it in my power. I did not think you ungrateful when you used to be silent, when you get a wife don't be quite so silent with her, she might feel slighted.

It's such a comfort to know that you are getting on all right and find people comfortable and nice, inclined to be friendly and so on. So the Super of the Hall has to work for his living like another man, glad he is so friendly with you. So you have had a talk with Dr. Gallaway and found him very agreeable, he may be able to help you in some way. I would not for the world have you keep back from entering the Ministry if you think it's your calling. The Lord will be sure to lead you aright only do your part as far as you know, it will be a sure living and a good living by and by so you need not trouble about making a lot of money. Still pray about it my son, you can trust the Lord with all your wishes and desires. He will be enquired of He knows what is best for all of us. I pray for you every day that you may do the right thing.

When I go to Coombe I walk down in the morning get away as early as I can, I enjoy it I must take my time, then Mary or Sydney drive me home at night. I think it does me good. I can get away better now I have only father to do for. I quite agree with you in buying bananas instead of fire crackers. Should like to get a job lot as you did, I like them dead ripe. I don't expect Dick you are saving much money, remember I do not think you are wasting it, the boots were cheap enough I should think, you must have clothes.

So Mr. Quick has a family of young children. The eggs coming in have been a nice little help to me this summer, there will not be so many next year if I live for we are killing away the old hens, only ten chickens coming on they won't be all hens. I have not been to St. Austell but once since you left. I wrote Auntie Lizzie and told her what you were doing. She thought it was very good for you to find something to do so quickly. She said God was taking care of you. She thinks you had done the right thing to go away. Of course Dick I know you will not be able to help me while studying for the Ministry, I shall live somehow I hope. I do often wish my faith was stronger so that I could more fully trust in God, he knows what trials we require. Father is gone away with the boys again today for timber. I know he does not feel so strong as he did, he never has thought about putting any thing by for old age or sickness, where his thoughts have been I never could make out.

I can't always send you long letters, I don't know what to say. I did think one day I wonder if my letters are interesting to Dick or if he gets tired of reading them. Now I know you like long letters from Mother I will do the best I can. Mrs. Crowle came to see me today. She remembers to you, her husband is rather poorly again. Mrs. Trudgian has been very gracious lately, I don't take much notice of her. Alf Nicholls is home for a few days, he likes your photo very much so does Mrs. Crowle. They both say you look like a gentleman not like a common man. Your mother likes to hear such remarks, but I don't want to make you vain. Alf thinks you should be a Minister. I told him perhaps you will be some day. You value the Revised Version. I dare say it may be very useful to you for New York until Saturday. Suppose I am posting today Thursday if I see anyone going up to the village I won't start.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens Church T.

August 5th 1904

Dear Dick .

Another letter to Mary for me written 23rd, post card came here 25th, you wrote it on the 25th I mean. That came yesterday, always so glad to receive your letters but I think sometimes what a number of stamps you have to buy, it helps to use up your money. You did not get my letter as you expected. The mail might have been delayed or it's just possible it might not have been posted in time. I am hindered sometimes when writing, it's Friday father gone to town, he won't be home for a little while yet, so thought I would begin a letter to you it may not be posted until Monday. I hope the new regulations at the factory will do you a little good. So you have a good rest in bed Sunday morning Dick, I don't expect it hurts you. I suppose the weather will not be so hot after this month. Am glad the "Star" arrived all right I don't think you enjoy sitting down reading my letters more than I do yours, my son. When I see Dr. Barry I will remember you to him. I thought he seemed greatly interested in you.

Pears are cheaper with you than they are here a good deal. I have not tasted a cherry this season. They are about gone now I expect. I had a few strawberries. [Saturday noon] We had some raspberries. They are very nice, not many gooseberries, have had some peas this year, picked just the last this week for tomorrow.

Now you have sent the money it will be taken care of, should you want it for a time you can have it again. Mary saw F. Varcoe at Pentewan last Monday he told her he should be coming to Coombe and would call on her with the money that will complete the £6 then as you say that's quite right. I think somehow if you can get in at the Seminary that you will go through after, never mind being poor for a while. God knows all about it, you may meet with good friends. It's very good of you to feel you would like to send me a present sometimes. I am sure it would be thankfully received if you had it to part with but dear Dick I do not need it just now.

So you have been talking with Dr. Gallaway again it will be good of him if he goes with you to Madison, much better than going alone. I trust that Dr. Buttz will approve of you, you must not get out of heart if things seem against you somewhat at first. It's nice for them to ask you to lead some of the meetings, they will get to know you better in that way, the people at the church I mean. I am glad you are getting in with people a little, you say you spent an evening. . . .

[The final pages of Charlotte's letter are lost.]

 

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Two early photographs of Coombe Village

 

This shows the village shop

The roof of the Wesleyan Chapel is visible behind the shop and behind the chapel is the path leading to Chapel Terrace where Mary Grace Lean and her family lived. This is where the old photograph showing Charles Yelland leading the horse and donkey was taken.

 

This view is taken from the bottom of the path leading up to Chapel Terrace

The chapel steps are on the right of the picture, the Sunday School entrance on the left (Charlotte Yelland referred to the laying of the foundation stones in her letter of August 13th 1907 - and the old school house can be seen clearly beyond that on the left. The photograph of the children was taken from the chapel steps. This part of the village remains unchanged and looks exactly like this today.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens C. T.

October 6th 1904

My dear Dick

I cannot tell you how thankful I feel for receiving your first letter from Drew Seminary this morning, it has comforted me greatly.

You have found the right place at last Dick. I do think God has been very good to you since you left home. I feel He has been caring for you and watching over you all the time.

Your post card came all right saying you were admitted. So you passed the faculty without any difficulty? The experience from Casely and Hope, with a recommendation from Dr. Gallaway satisfied Dr. Buttz, it is good of them. You say you are far behind the requirements of a regular student so you will take studies as a special. I think you have found a good friend in Dr. Buttz, how nice for him to tell you to call for him when you went before the Faculty and to explain your case and the other professors all speak in the same kindly way and so you are told to feel that this is home. Oh Dick, it's lovely at last you have found a happy home. I trust no schoolboy tricks but they act as christian gentlemen. You feel you are a brother among brothers. The society must be delightful.

No one but myself knows how I have longed for refined society through life but I don't mind so much now as long as I know you are all right. Have you a bedroom to yourself? I suppose you will have it colder there than we get it here. Still you may not feel it more as the rooms are warmed and all the surroundings nice. I think it must be a beautiful place by what you say. You can get hot water for shaving on the heater in your own room, how nice. Those woods must be lovely, do mind your health and go out when you can. The grounds must be large. Am so glad you have a chance to do a little shorthand and typewriting for Mr. S. G. Ayres to give you a little pocket money. You will have Saturday to do any thing for yourself and perhaps study a little as well. Service in the chapel every morning except Saturday very good.

Good advice to say they would rather for you to be good christians than good scholars. I think you will be trained aright Dick.

So thankful the board is good, apple sauce is good for you. Now my son I can any time put up with a short letter or a post card if you are busy as long as I know you are all right. Father does not care much for the papers you send, so you can save that little.

Mrs. Huthridge is still in bed very weak indeed.

Jeff Nicholls was married last evening I suppose he wrote to say it would be on the 5th.

                 With best love

From your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens C. T.

October 22nd 1904

My dear Dick

Yours of the 8th came this week all right, one to Mary last week. You may use pencil instead of pen it's all the same to me. You ask if father had many passengers to Summercourt on fair day, it was late when he started. The first time he had a fair load, not so many the second time, he was pretty well pleased I think. It was one of the most delightful days we have had for the summer, never more people there than this year. Mrs. Rowse did not go but Violet with her father and two young lady friends from London went just for the drive. They just stopped for a minute then went on that is all we saw of them. I don't hear any thing about V going to America now, nor yet about her getting married, if I should go to town soon I may see her and have a talk, but I don't go very often.

So you don't forget "Gennie" poor old thing she is going on just the same, she has taken you many miles in the night.

Frank Parkin is married to Miss Lord, hope they will get on all right, her father did not want her to leave him. You don't know Dick how thankful I feel because you are where you are and that you are about the work you love. So Elizabeth is no fancy place of yours, I have never once asked you if you were homesick. I did not like to, so glad you do not get run down and tired now. You will dream sometimes I suppose, I do.

You seem to enjoy yourselves evenings with the young fellows, hope it will do you all good.

When a member of the Faculty dies, he lies in state. I suppose it's what they always do out of respect for the one departed. So you have a great many students this year from various parts of the world, are they all intended for Ministers! If I can get any little views I think you will like you shall have them. You must try to keep up heart Dick and hope to see old England again some day if all is well. If you send a letter once a fortnight that will do, perhaps sometimes a post card if you are busy. I can send you a sheet of paper when I only write one, can't send stamps. Am glad to know that you would be well cared for if you are sick, it's good to know that you are well at present. Father says he doesn't know the words of those songs you ask for only just a line in and out, perhaps Mrs. Menear could let you have some you would like. "Monday 24th."I wish you Dick to tell me all your wants for I will help you, don't you need a new overcoat? Get it and I will send you some money. Tell me in plain English exactly what you will need to go through the first year and if you have enough for clothes. I have £10 waiting for you whenever you want it, when it's sent I intend to ask Mr. Searle the butcher to manage it for me at Truro post office then no one around here will know any thing about it. When I only write one sheet of paper I can enclose a sheet for you.

With best love and wishes I am

Your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

February 14th 1905

Dear Dick

Post card "Statue of Liberty" came last week. Glad you enjoyed yourself with the other fellows at New York.

So you have had a big blizzard, hope we shall not get any thing like that. We are having some beautiful weather, sunshine day after day. I went to chapel Sunday evening, heard the first preacher it was chapel anniversary. Today is the tea, service afternoon and evening, shall go over tonight if I can, father and Sidney are away again today cutting down trees. Hope they will not be late home.

Father goes on pretty fair, sometimes a bit queer. I have not seen him so mad as he used to be for a long time, hope I never shall again. Mrs. Truscott at Creagavose died last Saturday morn, only ill a few hours, going to be buried this afternoon. I don't know if she were ready for death. I am sure she is 77.

I hear that Mrs. Searle has received a long letter from you, John told me, he seemed quite delighted.

Last evening Mable Martin came in for missionary money, she was talking about you, is so glad you are getting on so well Her sister likes school work she says.

Her other sister in London is well and very comfortable. Mr. Bennetts is all right, the cold bath did not hurt him, poor old man.

You must not mind a short letter sometimes, I don't think the less of you for writing little. I have more picture post cards to send, will get some Newquay views as well.

With best love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

A photograph taken in Coombe

 Mary Grace Lean, Blanche and Frank standing on the left. Gennie, the donkey Richard Yelland chose and rode, which was mentioned in some of Charlotte's letters, stands next to the horse being led by Charles Yelland. (Could the horse be "Parkroyns" as mentioned in Charlotte's letter dated November 6th 1906?) A load of brushwood is being carried. (1904?)

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

February 27th 1905

Dear Dick

Your post card of the 11th came all right. I do remember you to a great many people when I meet them here and there. They are always pleased to hear of your welfare. When I get out more I expect to see more people. The weather is very wintery now, such cold showers, hail, snow and sleet. I don't think folks are going to forget you, they all seem to think you are going to do well.

Hodge has been here this evening, he is greatly interested in you, so glad you are getting on like you are. I know Dick that you are greatly interested in all that is going on at home. Ask me any questions and I will try to answer them. If I come across a picture at any time that I think you will like I shall send it on. So you have made your room look nice, am glad of it. My old almanac has come again, I like to get it. The young George Truscott of Haliwick is living at the Commercial Hotel, Grampound Road now, he is agent for the Yorkshire Insurance Company. He has sent us a nice little almanac. I don't like him living where he is very well, seeing so much drink about all the time, better for him to be in a private house. I should think he wouldn't remain home on account of his sister. I don't think his father drinks so much now. The money his mother left him is all spent, he works again now, he did nothing while that money lasted. The old man lives with him. The daughter has a fine little boy. I hear it's very sad for them all. A respectable family gone to ruin.

Father doesn't do any trade with Squires now, they have not paid up all yet, it's a long time in hand.

Bennett is not coming on at all, father told him last Friday that he should put it in court next Friday if he did not pay up before, shall see now how it goes, he drinks he is no good. I will remember Gennie with a crust sometimes on your account, she is very good. Some man would like to buy her the other day, father told him he would not part with that donkey for £5 so you see Dick you did a good thing when you bought her. I believe father values her very much.

I don't hear any thing about Phillipa getting married, I think they are waiting for her young man to pass another exam first. She is just the same age as our Mary, so she is old enough. Mary has had a bad cold is better now. Sidney and the children are well.

When I see Mrs. Trudgian I will tell her how delighted you were to have that photo of the wagon and yard, I thought it would please you, her husband goes to his "duty" every day still. The regular exams do not come on until May. I hope you will be prepared when the time comes. What do you think of doing in the long vacation? God will help you if you pray to him in faith, it does delight my heart Dick to know that you love prayer, the more we pray the better. Father is sawing this week with Charlie he is not cutting very heavy timber. Sidney is working with W. H. Smith for a few days. I expect he will be in the yard a good deal, father needs him. He is going on pretty well, fairly comfortable, he is not all I could wish but never mind we can't new make him. Our Heavenly Father knows all about it and so do I. I believe it's wrong to worry about things we can't help, if we were to cast all our burdens on the Lord we should be much freer from care. So you have fixed up your coat nicely with the lining I sent. I don't think it will pay you to spend much time mending those flannels of yours, get new ones, am sorry you had not got new ones before you left home, but I thought you were going to your Aunt and the time seemed so short. Your leg quickly wears out the flannels in one place so keep some of the best part of the old to mend that, put it on in a quick way, never mind. I wish you could find some old Love that would do your mending cheap. Your Feb 13 to Mary all right, answer that another time, it is good of you to write Mother so often.

With love from your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

April 11th 1905

Dear Dick

Your post card came last Saturday all right written with the typewriter. Am glad you can find so much time for typewriting and shorthand. It's such a help to you now in your need. Mrs. Searle from Grampound Road called to see me today she had not long to stop because her husband was out side waiting, said she would come another day and stop a little longer, had you been her own brother I don't see how she could think more of you. There is something real and true about her, she says they never have tripe for supper Wednesday nights now says she doesn't like to hear about it, you used to sit in the settle, she feels that there is some one missing. She is thankful you are doing so well, said I must remember her to you. I told her you would not have much time for writing letters until the summer vacation. She quite understood that, she thinks you are in your right place and so do I.

Father is gone to Creed Farm today. A post card from Mr. Tretheway yesterday asking him to come today as he had taken down an elm tree on the garden hedge, he wished to have it removed at once, I suppose it was in the way. Sidney and Charlie are sawing, W. Coomb helping, he is a very active boy. Sidney has been crossing father lately, so you can just fancy what he is like, father wants to build another new wagon and a wheelbarrow. Sidney says they are not wanted. The wagon can be done without and there are barrows enough to last for the next twelve months, father is most dreadfully put out to think Sidney should dare to interfere, he said better you try to save a few pounds, he said the engine was all the time going back in value and he must look after himself a little. Sidney is a black sheep too now, father needs someone to speak that is not afraid so how it will end I can't tell you. I must say I did not feel sorry when I knew how it was, Mary thinks Sidney will find father out now, it will never do for father to go on and do as he likes all the time. Sidney wants to be Master, father says Sidney likes to say what he thinks but it will not do, however he is going to speak whether father likes it or not. I think I used to side with father rather, but now he is finding him out.

F. Huthridge wishes to be remembered. Mrs. Nicholls told me the other day that she had been up to see poor W. Truscott, she doesn't think he can live long, he is confined to his bed, he told her he had received a nice letter from you. I shall try to go to see him very soon. My cold is much better again. I want to be out gardening now a little as the weather gets warmer.

With love from your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 [Enclosure: Newspaper cutting.]

 

“The kindest and the happiest pair

Will find occasion to forbear;

And something every day they live,

To pity and perhaps forgive."

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

 

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, New Jersey

 

Richard joined the Seminary in 1904 and graduated in 1908. He worked part time in the library

during his four-year course.

 

Mead Hall

 

Dr. Henry Anson Buttz

President of Drew Seminary from 1880-1912.

Dr. Buttz assisted Richard in gaining entrance to Drew in 1904.

 

The J. B. Cornell Library Building

 

(The above 2 illustrations were sent as e-mail attachments from Drew University.)

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

Interior of the Cornell Library

 Taken in the early years of the twentieth century, when Richard was assisting the librarian.

The Rose Window can be seen high up in the far wall.

 

The Rose Window

When the Cornell Library was razed in 1937 the window was removed and placed in storage for over forty years. No formal records were kept of its whereabouts. It was in 1978 when plans to add a Learning Centre to the Rose Memorial Library were almost finished that it was unexpectedly rediscovered in a crate in the attic of the Hall of Sciences. The decision was taken to restore the window to a place over the library's new entrance. The window is nine and a half feet in diameter.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

May 29th 1905

Dear Dick

I was delighted this morning when the post brought me your post card, along with the "Year Book of Drew Theological Seminary" and the photos. I found your dear face very quickly. Poor old Bunny came to enquire for you today. I showed him your photo, told him it came today, he was pleased, said remember me to him and tell him I am feeling the infirmatives of old age, he seems to have great confidence in you.

Am glad to see your name in the Junior Class. So the exams are all over. You have done fine in the Hebrew only one letter wrong, fancy nearly perfect. Thank God that you have done so well Dick. I should think you have done well in all those you have mentioned, such a number of things to go through and study. Suppose we shall hear soon how you are going to manage through the summer. I dare say the Professors will tell you they are pleased with the attention you have paid to your studies.

I went to St. Austell last Friday quite seven months ago since I was there I think. Uncle Fred was highly pleased to hear how well you are getting on he thinks you are in the right place. Auntie thinks the same. They have heard people speak of you preaching at St. Austell. Walter Arthur was in again last night, he always asks for you and seems deeply interested in all I say about you.

I went to chapel last evening, just after I got there father came, I didn't know he intended to go. I can't tell the time when he has gone to chapel of an evening. We are having dry weather week after week. Rain is very much needed now, sometimes it looks as though it would come but it brightens off again. I suppose you have it pretty warm now.

I sent away the "Star" yesterday for you also the "Christian Herald." Father is gone away today. Sidney and Charlie sawing. We have sold a great number of egg boxes this season, eggs will be going less now, still we shall sell a good many more yet. There is not enough of other timber selling to please me, times are dull and money scarce. I should think the shops in Church Town were doing very well, they look as if they were getting on.

Arthur Yelland has been painting the back windows of the houses today, he appears to be going on all right with his wife. I don't hear any thing about "cards" or "cake." Suppose there is none.

Father appears to be highly pleased because you are doing so well in the exams, I can't tell when he is going to write to you. If I say any thing he says I can do it best.

                        I am

Your Loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

[Part of Charlotte's letter inscribed in pencil "June 20, 1905".]

. . . . think Teabo and Drew would be ten times better than Elizabeth more healthy for you. My fingers are well now am thankful to say.

The front garden is just tidy, I have not such nice flowers as some people get. We have some gooseberries not so many as I should like, shall have a few raspberries, the gardens need more attention but they can't have it at present, we shall have some apples. I have not heard anyone say yet what the prospect is for apples. So you get blackberries and huckleberries, hope you will enjoy them when they come, cherries are very good when ripe. Grampound Road people are well, they had their Sunday School tea yesterday. They had better weather than it is today. John Searle told me this morning they got on very well. Next Sunday and Monday it will be at Coombe. The Rev. Tappitt is at Devonport I believe now he has left St. Austell. My dear Dick I cannot tell you how glad and thankful I feel to know that you have passed such grades and to know that you have been congratulated so I do thank our Heavenly Father for your success. I can't express myself as I would like, you know I was always behind at that sort of thing. So Mr. Ayres told you you were looking better since the exams, it must have done you good to get through so well, it made you feel light and happy I am sure. Am glad you can do a little in the library, it's all a help. Your post card, "typewriting" direct came on the 12th hope you will be able to get on well with Greek as well as other things. I did feel thankful to see your name in with the regular students.

Now my dear Dick I wish you to have a new leg, only say and I will send you £10 if you need it or a little more. I shall be pleased to do it, some day when I need it perhaps you will be able to let me have it again. I should get Mr. Searle to send it from Truro. I shouldn't care to send it from here, you would get on better with a nice one. You say you wonder sometimes if I miss you my dear Dick. I think sometimes that no one was ever missed much more. I have never said much to you about it for I wish you to be free and happy. I would not have you sad for the world, but I was for a long time. I did not know how to go into your bedroom or see any thing that belongs to you. Your old leather collar is still on your dressing table as you left it and one or two other little things, there they will remain. I am some what got over it now because I think your going away is for your good as long as you are all right I can get on. I have more to say but must leave it for next time. With best love from

Your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

June 26th 1905

My dear Dick

I am writing a part of my letter today to help against tomorrow. Hope you had a good day again yesterday at Teabo. I think a good deal about you on the Sunday, so glad you have no trouble to get up sermons, how delightful it would be if I could just walk into your church one Sunday and see and hear you my son, it would be happiness complete, but never mind we can't get all we would like in this world, if we could we should wish to live here always. If I can't see you your letters are a great comfort to me. I call them my love letters.

It's so nice for you to be with those people from Roche and St. Dennis it seems more like home, you may find some of their books very useful. Those fire fIys must look lovely I should think. I think it's time for you to exchange pulpits with another sometimes if one's sermon will do the both places. If this young Robbins can help you in Greek it will be fine. So you get a drive sometimes going from one church to another. I hope the people will be good to you in that way.

I don't expect I shall be able to go to Coombe this summer if Sidney is here all the time. I go over in the gardens and yard all I can it's very nice there. We are having a little warm weather now quite hot yesterday and today lovely. I shall write you a letter when I can, sometimes you may only get a post card. Jimmie Webb called here a few weeks since father was away, he very kindly enquired for you. So pleased to hear that you were getting on all right. John Curra's daughter Lotty at Perranporth is very well and comfortable I believe, she has a dear little boy. Mabel is at Church Town school now doing well. She is a very grand young lady. Flossie Bullen is in America studying to be a Dr. America is the country if you wish to do any thing. I believe the congregations are keeping up at Trethose and I think more people attend our chapel here since the seats have been free. I don't think there is so much fuss now as at first, hope it will go on all right.

Uncle Edward is gone to London today will return in a few days. I am glad you had a nice little talk with him, he does seem a nice sensible sort of fellow, I think, as he said that he has a nice home, of course he knows something of what father is like. I do think my dear Dick that it's for your good you went to America but no one can tell how I miss you. I always remember you in my prayers and I know you do me.

How did you come to tell Uncle Edward that my yeast cake was the best in the world. I don't think so. I have not fully answered your last two letters now but as I am sending "Roche Rock" there is not room for more. Tell me any little thing you would like me to send to you. We shall find out when Uncle comes back from London what he will have room for, he has not brought much with him I heard him say so. I expect Uncle Edward and his brother will come with us when they return from London.

We had the preacher here to tea Sunday 25, called Found, lives somewhere in the parish he is a R. C. seemed very nice, asked for you. He said F. Varcoe tells them so at the work when he received a letter from you.

Mrs. Searle came to see me last week, it is wonderful the way she talks about you, had you been her own dear brother she could not think more of you. I shall try to go out there one afternoon if I can she sends her best love to you. if I send you money I shall let Mrs. Searle do it for me at Truro.

                            I am my dear Dick

Your Loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

July 11th 1905

My dear Dick

Your letter to Mary June 22 has come all right. We are getting on all right with Uncle Edward. I think he is a very nice man, he and his brother are staying here with us now. I feel I want to do my very best for them. Your Uncle and Aunt have been very kind to you, of course I have not got Mr. Richard's house nor table for them but any thing I can do or get for them I am going to. I don't think they can take the Commentary. They have a good deal to take back with them, a clock that belonged to his mother and I don't know what. I am going to send you a parcel, they will take that all right.

You shall have the Commentary some time Dick. Now my son about the leg that you must have as soon as possible. There will be £10 sent off for you tomorrow “Wednesday.” I expect I have given it to Mr. Searle he will manage that for me at Truro. I have sent ten because I wish you to have a little by you, we never know what might be wanted. I don't wish it returned very quickly, it's as well in your keeping as any where. I would rather supply you with the money than for you to get it from the registrar of the Seminary. I am so glad to be able to help you in any way. It was very good of Mr. Gilbert to say he thought you could have the money out there but I think it will be better for you to have it from a friend. I don't want Uncle Edward to know that I have any money. That would not do. I am so thankful you spoke of me to him as you did he told me how you thought a good deal of your Mother. I have been misrepresented to him and his friends, it's been done to screen the guilty, so I have had to suffer, it seems hard but it will all be put right some day. I shouldn't like to tell Uncle the sense of things for it would be too dreadful, he might not believe it all if I did tell him.

We had lovely weather on Sunday. A. J. Lanyon preached. Yesterday was the tea, weather not good, obliged to have the tea in doors, however they got on very well. Father and I went over to the tea, Uncle Edward would have me go, said I must come “he went over earlier.” So I went to please him, got on nicely, carried my own bread and butter. I saw Mr. Pearse he very kindly enquired for you, says he is delighted to know that you are getting on so well and wish to be remembered to you. I saw Sam Goudge he said he was coming to see me as soon as he could but he had been so busy. Capt. Tom Olver wishes to be remembered to you. Poor old Bunny called again to know how you were getting on yesterday.

Am glad you are still so comfortable at Teabo, I expect you will find the weather rather hot. I think it's better for you every way where you are than at Elizabeth. I expect you will get more used to the climate as time goes on. I do hope your health will keep good. We are all pretty well, things going on in the yard just as usual and times are dull all about, can't get the money in. I will tell you more as time goes on.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

July 17th 1905

Dear Dick

Yours marked Madison 5th is come all right. Father said he should think you must be getting on very well when he read the letter. I am not at all put out Dick when a card comes instead of a letter. I often say to Mary, I don't know how you can find time to write so many letters as you do. I don't think for a moment that you treat me with indifference. I would rather get only a post card sometimes so that you can have more time for something else. Your letters and cards are a very great comfort to me you may depend but I am not selfish. I sadly miss your presence I can tell you, for when you used to go away of an evening and I should go to bed expecting to see you again in the morning and I was not disappointed. I have not forgotten how I would keep awake and listen to hear you return at night. I shouldn't like you to have such times to go through again, it was hard I thought, of course I could see you then and now I can't but never mind I believe your going away is for your good. I feel I can bear the separation if it's for your good and I do sincerely believe it is, if you keep bright and happy I shall get on. When you feel sleepy go to bed don't sit up to write me a letter, a card will satisfy. I dare say if you mix with the people and make them feel you are at home with them that they will be more willing to go to church to hear you preach, be one with them as far as you can and they will like you all the better. Am glad you are having some cherries, fruit is good but don't swallow the stones, so you had a good pasty and any amount of cream. I do hope you will put on a little fat after a while.

Blackberries are ripe with you before they are with us. I go out in the garden and pick a few raspberries every day now, we have had a few gooseberries and some currants. I do like to know that you are well. Am glad the mosquitoes don't bother you much. It does me a world of good to know that the Presiding Elder is so well pleased with you and the people to speak of you as they did to him. It does seem to me that you are doing the right sort of work and I sincerely trust that God will bless you and prosper you through life. Uncle Edward has been to Coombe two or three times last week, they were here at our place, would go some place a part of the day but come back here to sleep. Sunday morning when they came down to breakfast I thought how very nice they looked both of them. They have every thing they want. Some time after breakfast they left for Spring Farm, spending two or three days with Tom Richards and family, said they expect to be around here again about Wednesday to sleep. At any rate, they have more places they want to go to by day, they have been to Newquay and intend to go again. I think they are enjoying themselves very well. You don't know Dick how thankful I am that you spoke of me in the way you did to Uncle Edward when you saw him not that you said much for of course there was not time but he told me he could see very plain that you thought a great deal of me, he said Mother was every thing with you. If Uncle Edward really knew the truth about father and things I don't know what he would do or say, he appears to be so respectable, there is nothing coarse or vulgar about him, neither about his brother. How different from what I have been accustomed to. Father has been very good to me in his way lately but I have no faith in him, he is so changeable and uncertain. I wonder what Uncle Edward would think if he knew that father doesn't allow me a shilling for any kind of clothes. My mends may get it for me or I may do my best. Of course I used to get a plenty of Aunt, now that is stopped years ago. I used to give father as much as £1-10 per week from the dairy and things to help him in every way I could and I was using the money I had given to me to dress myself and children and he spending the money on others. My telling you this won't hurt you I hope for it is the past it does not hurt me now. We might be comfortably fixed now if father had done as Uncle has through life, when father was a young man, the first time he went abroad I mean Uncle Edward got him something to do at once, I heard Uncle say so here one day. See what he has done for himself and family by remaining in one place all those years, now he is well off and we are poor. I can't help it so I must put my trust in God and he will not let me want. I have written you as I have so that you will be able the better to answer your Uncle when you see him if anything should be said, of course I don't know what he thinks of me now, I know in the past he has not thought well of me. He seems very comfortable here and I am going to do my very best for him. I am pleased very much to have the opportunity of doing something for him, because he and Aunt Ellen wrote you so kindly.

There is a letter on the way to you now from Grampound Road people, hope it will reach you all right with the £10. The paper of Madison and District came all right. So your lodging house lady at Teabo has been away, so you get breakfast across the road with people called Richards from Cornwall. Am glad you feel at home with them. I have been so wanting you to find some one that will sew on buttons for you and do little things. Tell Mrs. Richards that your Mother is very much obliged to her for her kindness to you. Sam Goudge came to see me last Saturday evening. I was glad he called said he would come again, he has been very busy, said he should write you, now I tell you he had called to see me. Mrs. Robins at the post office was pleased to be remembered. She and her husband with Minnie are all just as usual.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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Mary Grace Lean with Blanche aged 5 and Frank aged 2

 Sitting outside 1 Chapel Terrace, Coombe. (1905)

 

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[Part of Charlotte's letter inscribed in pencil "August 15, 1905".]

. . . . had said to me that you feel as if you had another Mother, she says motherliness is the most lasting beauty I know of and we do feel such a warm interest in your boy because of himself he came with us as our own boy and was always a good example for John. You have got hold of her heart somehow Dick. She is clever and intelligent and knows how to write a proper letter. I feel I am a long way behind her. I know I shall never be able to reward her for so much kindness. I know our Heavenly Father will reward her sometime. He doesn't forget little deeds of kindness.

Mary brought me a few blackberries today, I must cook them tomorrow if I can. First I have seen.

I don't think Dick that I worry much about Sidney and father but I don't like his principle, he is sarcastic and jeering it seems to me, he likes us to feel that we are under him and beholding to him, he behaves sometimes like a man that owns all the place, of course it's for want of knowing better - he has never had any proper bringing up but he is so conceited and proud, he is very good to Mary and he loves the children, he lacks education, he thinks he knows every thing. I like to tell you what I think. You can any time send me a letter to Mrs. Crowle or Mrs. Searle. Mrs. S  knows you are going to get a new leg. Don't try to return the money for some time, it's all right with you.

With love from your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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(Undated sheet numbered 2.]

. . . .We shall not have many apples this year. I believe they are not so very plentiful this season.

Grenville's people are all well I think, his wife has been very free with me lately she often comes in on a Sunday evening.

I told you on my last letter that I would tell you more about Sidney, it's all very well for him to try and keep father from doing some things that he wants to do, but Sidney is a man that must not be told any thing, father will tell him how to sharpen a saw, but he will do it in his own way, and box making he uses the wrong size nails, is not careful at all, father says he has had more complaints from Mr. Arthur this season than ever he had before in all the time he has been making them. I am very sorry but I don't know what is to be done. Sidney is just all the time doing things the wrong way, he will alter little things to the engine on the saw bench, if father is sawing and wants Sidney to come to him he won't move until he has finished the box he is making. I don't like his ways at all, it seems to me because he paid for the engine that he thinks all the place belongs to him. I really do not think he will ever be fit to carry on the timber trade he has too much conceit, he laughs at father and the boys for bringing home such small loads. I don't believe in killing the poor horse, he will over load then has to take off some again. Father says he can't trust Sidney to go for timber. Now dear Dick you must be careful what you write about Mary seeing the letter. . . .

[Final pages of Charlotte's letter are missing.]

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

April 23rd 1906

My dear Dick

Post card to hand today. So you have left Tebo for the present. I dare say you will have a chance to visit your old friends again some day. I shall be looking forward to the time when I shall be able to hear something about your new charge at Summerfield.

How do you get on about your food at the restaurant? I often think whether you have what you like or not to eat, there is always something to put up with, go where we will that is not exactly to our liking.

Father is not well by a long way, he can't do much. The Doctor says he must have a good rest. Sidney is here for the time, father feels dreadfully restless to be in doors so much, busy time about boxes too now. There is not much else selling, don't appear to be scarcely anyone coming to the yard. You see Roberts at Court Mills and Ralph Goldsworthy up beyond, they don't come from the works now so much as they did, a party came the other day wanted some gates and couldn't have one, that is just how it's going on. Yet father told some one the other day in my presence that trade was never better, had he been able to attend to it. However the man came to say such a thing I can't understand, he knows what hard work he has had to find money to pay interest again this spring, it's only partly paid yet. I think there is rather more than £20 to pay to Mr. Richards. It's as hard work as ever to find enough money to pay wages and live. Father says he can't afford to provide me clothes. It's a pity if I am not doing enough for my food and clothes. I don't ask him for any thing for myself: I am most thankful that I can manage a little without troubling him. So in the midst of all of it I have a great deal to thank God for. I think the most I have to be thankful for is about you, to think you are where you are. Had you stopped at home until now it would be two years more lost to you, in fact thrown away. Now my dear son don't worry for if father is getting done I hope I shall live some way. We can't tell who will go first, but father does seem like a man wearing out, he may pick up again a little after a rest, time will prove. Mr. Trudgian is down, has been very ill indeed and is still, inflammation on the lungs, he has to be fed like a baby poor man. I believe they are hoping the worst is past.

With love from your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

(On page one of the above letter Richard has added in shorthand: Father was suffering from gravel.)

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

May 7th 1906

My dear Dick

Postcard to hand this morning. I don't expect you find time for much letter writing now. I will excuse you until the exam is over. I do hope you will get on fairly well.

After the exams are over I hope to hear something about your new charge about the people and the country and what things are like generally. I hope you will be comfortable somewhere through the summer months. So the weather is greatly improved with you and it is cheering to see the flowers and leaves coming out. Our thorn hedge looks lovely now, such a fresh beautiful green. Father is still very poorly, he can scarcely do anything, he is like a man breaking up. I sometimes think he will never be strong again, this complaint he is suffering from is very bad, it has greatly pulled him down. I never saw him so weak before in my life, he is in the sofa now, can't go out but very little. The weather has been very cold yesterday and today it's milder, shall get some warm weather soon I hope. Chilblains are going away from my hands. My poor nose is bad still.

Sidney is still going on in the yard. I don't think he cares much about it though.

"Tuesday morn." Father is come down stairs earlier today, said he felt better, so he went down to the yard and tried to work a little, but he couldn't get on, was obliged to come in. Sidney is gone to Carnanton today with two boys, he bought some timber there a few days ago, it's a dear lot, he doesn't understand it. I am sorry we are taking him from his own work. I am afraid he will lose by coming here to oblige father, however father says he will pay him the same as he gets masoning. I don't believe there will be money to do that for long. I do sometimes think and wonder what it will come to, God only knows. I believe He will do for the best. His ways are not our ways. I feel more thankful all the time that you are where you are. You left home just in the right time, none too soon. Mary and the children are very well. When they came up last week I told Blanche to go into the sitting room and see if there was anything on the table that she had not seen before, if so for her to bring it out for her Mammy to see. As soon as she went in she shouted "Uncle Dick," she knew you in a moment.

With love from your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

June 11th 1906

Dear Dick

Yours May 28th came this morning. I will address letters to Mr. D. Pierson until further notice. You will be glad to know that father seems better, he can't work hard but he is about most of the time now. I almost thought he was finished a few weeks ago. He doesn't wish me to stop sending you the papers, I wish to send them if I can for I think it's nice for you to see the home papers. The egg box business will not be quite so brisk now. Am very glad you are so comfortably fixed for the summer. I hope you will not be working very hard for a time. I get out about the yard and garden a good deal now in the evenings, it's lovely. We have had nice weather the last few days. I think we shall have some apples if the boys don't carry them off. There will be some gooseberries and raspberries too in the back garden.

So the stewards have paid you a little money just to keep you going, very good of them. It's very kind of the Piersons to do the most of your washing for you. I think Dick you enjoy those festivals with ice cream and candy and all the good things. I do hope you will have a pleasant time when the children's day arrives.

Mr. Huthridge is not married yet, don't think he will be for a time, his lady love is in a very good situation and he gets on comfortably with Mrs. Nicholls so I believe they have decided not to be married for a few months longer. I think it's all right between them. She seems like a very respectable, refined little body. Fred Whether and his wife are going on all right. They don't come down this way very often, they speak but they are not very friendly. We have received a post card of Sam Francis as well. The city will soon be built again I expect. "Tuesday." Father is in the yard again making egg boxes. Sidney is certainly best fitted for masoning. The yard will not support two families either. Father told me he would pay Sidney the same as he got masoning. S. can any time get 24 or 25 shillings per week masoning and shorter days. When we are sawing he comes early before 7 in the morning and remains until 6 or after at night, he only gets £1 per week. I know father can't afford to pay more but I can't be going on losing 4 or 5 shillings weekly. After he leaves work often there is a chance to get a little more. I think of Mary and the dear little ones. I believe a pound is as much as Sidney is really worth in the yard but for the sake of his family he must look after himself. Sidney is coming again on Thursday I suppose to saw for two or three days. I said to father the other day you don't pay S. the same as he gets masoning, by what he said then I don't think he intends to now, father can say one thing and do another you know. I can't tell how it will work out I am sure. I don't mean to worry about it Dick more than I can help. I feel it's all in God's hands, He knows what is best and I believe what He does will be right. I shall be brought through some way. I know Dick I have your prayers and best wishes and you have mine. I do believe Providence has led you where you are and I feel most thankful on your account I can tell you. I am so glad you like America. I believe a good education is a very great blessing. I think that was a very kind and great compliment the Professor paid you when he told you you were one of the most faithful men in his class. I am delighted to hear any thing like that. The private letter came all right, thanks for it. I think the people are very good to you at Summerfield.

I hope you will have a plenty of fruit and all the good things. Mary and the children are all right. I don't want you to send me any money my son. I have enough for my private use for the time.

With love from your Affectionate Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

November 6th 1906

Dear Dick

Post card came all right. I dare say you are very busy. So you have received another letter from Ray Minnear? He will be one more for you to write to. Don't trouble about writing me long letters for the present.

I scarcely know how to begin but I want to tell you some thing about our affairs now. About three weeks ago father and Charlie were sawing and the boiler commenced to leak. They had to stop working and take out the fire. We sent away to Mr. Visick. Engineer Devorn had a man here two days but did not stanch it, then Visick wrote to say what would have to be done and how it would cost thirty pounds, of course we couldn't stand that. Charlie Pascoe said he could put it right. Then father met with Ralph Goldsworthy, he said to father I hope you will give me the first chance if you think of selling up the business. So we thought it over and decided to let Ralph have it all, father will work on with him and do what he can, some days he can't do much. Ralph has had the boiler put right for the time at any rate. The Deed I have will be transferred to Ralph. Friday week the money has to be paid down, £435 better than I thought we should do. Of course there won't be much left by the time all debts are paid. I shall be very glad for Sidney to have his money £200. Then £150 to Aunty, you understand all about that, I am thankful. There is £18 to pay Mr. G. S. Richards and other little bills. It will be worth something to feel out of debt. The land and all is gone from us now. A long time ago Sidney said to father that the engine was gone back £50 in value, now it's gone back £50 more. The debts could never be paid if we had not sold the business. We must live within our means now. I don't expect father will get very much, 2/- a day better than going on the parish.

Ralph is going to have the sitting room for an office. I shall take most of the things out of the room, he will pay me 30 shillings a year, it will help the rent. Now dear Dick I can't tell you how thankful I feel because you are out of it. You must not trouble about me. I have always had enough to eat and drink thus far and some thing to wear, if we trust in God he will not forsake us. It seems strange though to me to think the yard and big garden are gone from us. It almost looks as though we are pushed out of the place. It's not only the boiler going wrong the poor old horse is just finished. We couldn't replace him, it would mean £20 or £25 to get another that would be much good and Parkroyns is gone from us.

They are starting mining again up there. Mr. Richards will have a part of his field taken away as well. There is going to be a large engine put in at once they are saying. It will be a fine thing for Church Town if the mine turns out good.

Ralph has got the donkey as well. They are going to saw again tomorrow I believe, father will be box making a good deal of his time I think.

A little card came all right in your letter last week about the Young Men's Christian Association. I was pleased to get it.

John Wallace enquired for you on Sunday night. I had a little chat with Sam Goudge, he said he had written you about the wedding. People have a plenty to talk about for the time, our selling out, some think we have made a great deal more of it than we have. The new Parson is come too, he keeps up in style I believe. They say he has six horses, a coachman and I don't know what all.

Good night dear Dick.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

November 19th 1906

Dear Dick

Yours of the 7 came today. Glad to hear you say my letters are as welcome as ever. I am sure yours are to me.

I suppose Sam Goudge will have a little more time now for letter writing and other things. I expect he feels very thankful to know that he has passed his exam, he told me the other day he would call on me very soon. Fred Varcoe is getting on all right his friends tell me. I asked him to drop me a post card but he hasn't done so yet. I suppose he is pretty near the Mormons by what I hear. So you are having lovely weather, it's cold showers and windy with us now, the hails have been coming down fine today. I did not go to chapel last night it was too black and cold. I heard the other day there had been some snow upwards, we must expect some winter now.

It's fine to drive about like you do when at Summerfield, be sure to dress warm Dick. I dare say the country looks very beautiful. I like to know that you enjoy it. I expect you enjoy the apples too. I don't know how you can manage to carry your suitcase and father's old portmanteau as well, you will be loaded. Am thankful you still feel so much at home with the Smiths, they are good to you.

This library society I expect is very good and helpful for young men, a quarter dollar a year is not much to pay.

Father is getting on quite as well as I expect him to, I don't think he can work hard, box making will do for him pretty well. The money was all paid for the business last Friday. Sidney got his   and the £150 to Auntie so I am better off than I expected to be. Mr. Richards is paid all, I am so thankful to know the debts are paid. I have feared many times that the money would never be raised to pay what we owe, now my mind is easy on that matter. You must not worry about me in the least my son for you know if father is not getting much, I can manage little things for myself.

Mary and the children are going on all right. John Yelland is living at Treviscoe now, he has been working with Ralph Goldsworthy for a long time.

The tractions are still running. I think we should have better roads if they were to stop. "Tuesday." Father is down in the yard box making now. Charlie and the other boy are up at Treviscoe working today. I think father will be able to go on in a quiet way for a long time yet, he says it's a great relief to him to know that the debts are paid.

From your Mother

C.Y.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

December 4th/06

Dear Dick

Yours of the 21 to hand. It must have been a piece of news for you to hear that the business was sold, I hope it's for the best. Father is able to work every day so we shall get on I hope.

Ralph is a very pushing young man, I wish him to get on and prosper. Jinny is not so young as she used to be, still she is useful. You ask what was the matter with the boiler, it was leaking, some say it was not worked enough. I asked father to write to you and explain things, but I can't tell when he will do so.

I know you have enough to do to get on, I think father will be sending you £5 before long that will be a little help, he has put £50 in the Post Office Savings Bank, there are several pounds to come in now and when we get some of it paid it will be sent to you. I can't bear to think of your being short of proper books Dick. Let me know very soon if a few pounds would be of service to you. I can manage quite well, I don't want it in the least. I would rather for you to have it and use it, I shall still have enough for my own use and there will be more coming. I shall send it through Mr. Searle as I did before, let me know privately what you think, remember my dear son I shall feel more pleased for you to have it than not. If you haven't so much money as you want you have still a great deal to thank God for. Am glad you prefer making your own sermons. I know Dick I can trust you, if you were to deceive me I don't think I should ever trust anyone again.

Many thanks for the little birthday card.

I should indeed be delighted to see you home some day, but don't trouble, you must not come too soon, as long as I can hear from you often and know that you are all right, I can get on. If you are obliged to go West first never mind, things will work out all right for the best I trust. Let us hope for the best and do what is right, then the way will open up.

We are having very dark dull days now, it's not very cold. Suppose you will soon be having snow now.

Mary and the children are very well I believe.

Mr. Clements and his son Tom have commenced to build Arthur Yelland's house. Busy times all about now. I don't go out much this dirty weather.

With best love from your Affectionate Mother

Charlotte Yelland

 

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Richard Yelland's Christmas card to his mother in 1906 from Madison, New Jersey.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

Jan 7th 1907

Dear Dick

Yours of the 8 to hand. So you get my letters you say on the Monday morning. Yours come to me the same time nearly every week. I look out hard and sharp for the post Monday morning I can tell you.

Am glad to know the Star reaches you all right.

It was fine for you to go to Tebo and see your old friends there on your way to Summerfield. I can fancy how delightful. You don't mind the walk if the weather is right. Very good of Mother Richards to give you a handkerchief, you say you have nearly a box full. I should think you would by this time, never mind, they won't hurt, handkerchiefs and neck ties, it's kind of the people to give you little things. You would not like your friends to think you did not value their little gifts. So you are settling down to school work again, rather better than usual you say after vacation, am glad to hear you say so and to know that your health is good, that means everything. Still attend to your health and go out when you feel like it. I suppose you will be very busy, you say you will not have time for any library work until March of course. Mr. Ayres knows just what you have to do. I suppose when I wrote about Spring Farm people I didn't write so plain as I should have done. It's Mable Richards that is so delicate, the eldest daughter, she is often in bed for a day or two, of course she lives home and helps her Mother when she is able. Lottie is a strong healthy girl, she teaches in Mount Charles school now, doing very well I should think, she gets quite £60 a year I believe, she may have more than that, I am not quite sure. Paul worked with his father on the farm and goes out with the wagon. Emmie is still down to Store Terras, the others are younger, I don't know much about them.

I suppose your friend John Smith has got a lot of apples, am glad you get so many.

Yesterday was nice mild weather so I went to Coombe. When I was leaving Blanche said I must send her love to Uncle Dick, then Frank said me too. Frank is four years old now a fine healthy boy. Baby is a little dear but rather small, he is between four and five months old. Jim Hill I am told is getting on all right now.

Mrs. Searle has posted a letter to you and sent off the £15 for you from me, hope it will go right.

From your Loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

February 12th/07

Dear Dick

Yours of the 15 Jan to hand. Henry commenced to work yesterday, his hand is going on fine, of course it's tender. The bone was not hurt, it was not nearly so bad as we feared at first.

Ralph has offered this place to Will Roberts, I can't tell what it may come to yet I am sure, but Will is not going to give nearly so much as Ralph is asking, there are so many things sold and removed from the yard it's not worth nearly as much now. The band saw is sold to T. J. Richards down to Coombe. Nearly all the timber is gone from the yard and there was a good lot there when Ralph took it. Bellows, plank and I don't know what all, most of these things are removed. I don't think Ralph knows his own mind two days together, he is talking about building houses on the land now, I believe. Will Roberts is attending to business well, he has a good run of it I think, what ever people want he seems to be able to get.

I don't think Sidney cares to have the yard now although he is paid back all his money. I believe he thought to have had every thing as it was before we sold it. I don't think he ever thought to pay back that £150 to Auntie and we should just be under him and he be master. I used to trouble about it sometimes fearing it might come to that. I am so thankful that it is as it is. Charlie says he wouldn't have stopped in the yard one week if Sidney had taken the yard, he didn't like working with Sidney at all. Charlie knows and understands a great deal more about the business than Sidney. Sidney wouldn't even look at father to learn how to sharpen a saw, he would say his way was as well as father's. I don't want to feel unfriendly towards Sidney, but I tell you this so that you may see just what he is like, he is dreadfully conceited, still he is very good to Mary.

I do hope you will get through the Senior exams all right this month.

So you have got snow on the ground again, it's not so cold with us now, yesterday was lovely weather. I went to Coombe again, today very windy with rain, am glad you enjoyed yourself at the reception Dr. Rogers gave. I think sometimes you are getting quite beyond us spending so much time with such refined people, but I am glad for you Dick, Very glad. I expect to hear very soon now that Mrs. Searle has received a letter from you.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

March 18th/07

Dear Dick

Yours of the 6 to hand. I am writing today because if the weather is fine tomorrow I may go to Coombe. The baby is much better. Your both post cards came all right. I was so glad to know you had passed the exams. I do like your letters to come, still I shall not be alarmed if they do not come exactly when I expect. You are having weather now my son, suppose there won't be much more snow now.

Ralph is taking away everything he can from the yard, they say the 25th of the month will decide it, so we must wait a few days longer. I will tell you when I know.

Charlie has left the yard, he starts for Canada Wednesday morning, he was here last evening for a long time, he is grown to quite a young man now. I do hope he will do well, he has promised to write and let us know what things are like out there. The engine seems to go on all right, of course you used to be interested in driving it.

Now Dick you must not think I was laughing at you when I said something about your mixing in such good society. You know better than look down on those who have not had the same chance. I don't think you are vain. I can't tell you how thankful I feel to know that you are in such good company. I have been thinking when you get married I shan't hear from you quite so often. I shan't mind that as long as I know you are happy and comfortable. You must mind your wife, then, with other things I don't suppose it will be for a while yet. Good of Mrs. Matthews to meet you at the station, you still come across some of Tebo people. John Smith's is still your headquarters, hope you will be with them a great deal this summer coming. I have no fault to find with a little fun as you say without nonsense. They appear to be very good religious people and want to do you all the good they can.

Now Dick I want to let you in to a little secret. I have £35 I am going to send to you. I know you will be glad to have it. I shan't need it for some time I hope, if you don't want to use it all at once put some where it will be taken care of, it was in the post office savings bank. Mary and I have had a little there for many years, no one else knew any thing about it, mine I have taken out to send to you, I have just £5 left with Mary's if I should want it. You must act fair with Mary if I should die. The £150 I should like taken into account, what I have sent you before need not say any thing about.

I am going to post this letter myself. Where shall I send it? To Drew or Belvedere? I hope to go to St. Austell soon, then it will be put right.

C.Y.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

April 9th 1907

Dear Dick

Yours March 27 to hand. Father is down to Court Mills now with Will Roberts, there last week and going on this, how long it will last I don't know, father is very changeful. I don't know yet what pay he will have, he has only had 2/- per day thus far while he was working for Ralph. I mean that is not enough to provide what he expects. I put by the rent each week out of it because that shall be all right, £6 a year now, rents are going up in Churchtown. Then there are rates and many other things wanted in a house besides food, we ought to have a small house somewhere if we could get it for half the rent, if we are all the time using a little of  what we have put away it will melt.

Father has put £20 more in the bank now that makes it £70. I am thankful it's so much as that. There are £5 in the house now I know but father hasn't told me so, perhaps he has a few shillings in his pocket and £5 or £6 more to come in yet, but father so often buys little things we could do without. I don't say anything to him but let him go on, I believe that is the best way. I believe father thinks he will be able to get "Old Age Pension" by and by, he talked like that the other day. We don't know what will be in the future, we must trust and wait.

I can't write very well today, I have a broken chilblain on the little finger of the right hand, it's bad for resting on the paper, the other fingers are doing fine, hope this one will soon be right now.

So you don't get paid for funerals, well Dick you must put up with that. I suppose it was worth something to be told you preached a good sermon. They need not put so much money in a casket, it does the dead no good.

Norman Truscott's eldest daughter Maud and John Clements are engaged, they are a very grand pair I can tell you. I believe Maud is getting on very well with her exams but so proud and high minded. Alf Nicholls is home very poorly, hope he will soon be better.

If you have any good news, let me have it.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

April 2nd 1907

Dear Dick

Yours March 19 to hand. Am glad to know my letters are reaching you all right now I address Belvedere.

I have sent on three pieces of stuff for book covering. I have more to send yet if you will have it, tell me which you like best the yellowish shade or the drab.

I suppose winter is not quite over with you yet, it's nice to have a day or two now and then like spring. I believe the people at Kernick are all well. I saw Mabel Martin the other evening. I don't expect that letter she wrote to you directed to Cornish ever reached you, strange too how it should be lost. I dare say you are a letter in her debt.

Mrs. Vandersluice will be highly pleased when I tell her you have remembered to her, her grand daughter who came home from America is living at Falmouth with her stepmother, she is in a shop learning to be a dressmaker. Mr. and Mrs. Crowle are going on just in the old way.

Father is gone down to Court Mills this week helping to make egg boxes for Will Roberts, how long he will be there I don't know.

So Dick you are still moving about among the people freely.

Mrs. Stout you say is rather a peculiar old lady, hope you will get on all right with her if she has some good points.

Sidney knows all about that £150. I have no reason to think he would say any thing about that. You know perhaps that Uncle Parkin has some property down to Camborne, he borrowed £150 from the bank, now he has paid that back and taken mine. Frank has his father's will and all papers in his keeping, he manages it all. There is a paper signed to pay me the £150 on demand. I did not care much to put it in Sidney's hands to manage for me. I think it will be all right with Frank. I shall have £6 yearly, the bank would only give £2-10.

Am glad you are still so friendly and comfortable with the Smiths. You speak of Miss Rinchart as being a very good christian girl. I hope if she is suitable for you that it will be brought about all right in good time, or there may be someone else just as good. God knows all about it my son and if you make it a matter of sincere prayer I think it will come out all right. Jeff Nicholls is a "father" of a little girl, he is very proud to write and tell his mother. The first is always something wonderful. Mary's dear little baby is quite well now I think, he is bright and cheerful.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

August 13/07

Dear Dick

Your post card July 31 came yesterday, you know I can put up with a post card when you are busy, of course you have still got to study and you must get out all you can for the sake of your health and so many people you have to visit, it all takes time.

I am thinking to go to Coombe when I have written this letter. I shall post it myself when I go up the village.

Last week was feast I believe it went off very well, the weather was fine both Tuesday and Wednesday. I went to Coombe last Tuesday and brought home Blanche with me. She slept in your room, she was anxious to know what feast was like. Wednesday I took her to the "Flower Show" it was very good indeed. The first time I have seen it.

We went in around the cemetery, Blanche saw George Brewer's grave and Alf Nicholls. George Brewer has a nice Headstone and a very pretty little tablet at the foot of the grave placed there by the staff of postmen of Grampound Road.

Ewart Minnear is home for his holidays, he preached over in our chapel on Sunday. I saw him out side one day he enquired for you wanted to know how you were getting on.

Our new Minister will soon be coming amongst us now I suppose. Pearce is leaving too, I think he is going to Bodmin some one said he is not considered much of a preacher, some think he had better follow the plough.

Feast Monday was the stone laying of the new Sunday School at Coombe they got on well I should think. There were ten stones laid. They profited something over £60 I believe with the "high tea" and all together.

Jim Searle came home last week from California, he was away twelve years, it doesn't seem so long. I think he did very well while away, he said they all expected to see you in California soon after you left England. I hope it's all for the best as it is. I think so at any rate. It's come to rain don't think I can go to Coombe today.

Father thinks I might send a post card sometimes instead of a letter. I generally want to say more than I can put on a post card.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

February 17 - 08

Dear Dick

Yours of the 5 to hand. I shall be very pleased if I come across more pages of “The Land and the Book” some day.

So you are having a little more snow, I can't say that we have had any snow this winter yet, don't expect much now, it's rain again today, last week it was dry and pleasant.

Bessie Bescum is the same red haired girl you used to know who lived in Catherine's old shop. I told you about Happy Jack's wife back at the time, you forget some things of course, now you are so far away and have so many things to attend to.

Now my dear son I do think you had better not come to England this summer, get properly established first, you will feel more comfortable and so shall I, pleasant as it would be in some respects but never mind let us try to do the best thing. When you join a conference you don't know what you will need, the money may be wanted to fix you up with good clothes and other things. Thereafter, I don't want you to be obliged to ask help of strangers. You know you can use what you have when you like and how you like. I am writing what I think will be for the best Dick. While I can get your nice letters so often and know you are well and happy I can get on. I cannot advise you about what conference would be best to join, you know better than I do about that. If you can't be ready to leave school by April wait until May, but somehow I think you are getting on pretty well with your work.

Your private letter came all right. I like to get a letter in that way now and then.

The handkerchiefs are very nice. I can see they have not been used. I don't want you to be sending me things often Dick. I may be glad some day to get something of you but not at present any how.

I noticed about the stamps on the envelope.

Mrs. Grenville Richards always speaks very friendly when I see her. Mrs. Martin acts as though she doesn't see or know me, some others do the same, it won't matter after a while, we shall all be one family in Heaven.

Am glad the boarding club is going on so well, it's quite a save to you, eggs and apples come in useful. I should like to attend chapel in the morning but I can't because of the cooking. Father never goes to chapel unless when he goes to Coombe.

The children are going on very well with the whooping cough.

Sometimes my letter is written a day or two before the boat goes out. I like to post it myself or send it by some one I can trust.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

March 9 - 08

Dear Dick

Your letter of Feb 26 to hand.

Am glad the little book about the United Churches has reached you all right. Things seem to be pretty sure to go when they are sent away. What a splendid thing the post is, what should we do if we couldn't send letters and receive letters often from those we love.

By your letter if things go as you expect you will very soon be moving. Well my son as Fulcomer and Yeoman said I think you would be very foolish to miss such a chance, go on and may God be with you. If you go to Iowa and take up supply work until the fall when they will hold their conference then you will get settled and established. Much better for you to do that than to lose time to come home this summer. I do think you will have to be married after a while if you can find a suitable young lady who is willing to cast in her lot with you, seven hundred dollars with a prospect of more and a parsonage to live in rent free. I think it's a good start and much to be thankful for.

The men get better pay in the West than they do in the East, perhaps the people got more money there. You know by this time I dare say if you are really going to be at your new charge in Iowa by the first Sunday in April. How quickly the last four years have gone.

Am glad the Sunday school people at Summerfield gave an entertainment and had a good time and cleared nearly twelve dollars, very good I should think.

What apples those good people must have to give you so many.

We had a taste of winter last week, very heavy snow showers, every thing would get white for a little while but it soon went away, it was not dry snow like you have.

They held a ten days Mission at the chapel last month. The Rev. W. F. Haddy "of St. Ives," I liked him very much. The people turned out very well. There was one conversion, that was all I believe. He said so much about the people being united, he told us we must all be brothers and sisters as one family, splendid advice if could only get at it, we should see more good done then.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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St.Stephen Post Office early 1900's

Is this where Charlotte posted some of her letters to Dick?

 

St.Stephen Church Town

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

May 18 - 08

Dear Dick

Your letter of the 4 to hand, it came on Saturday. I don't expect to get your letter until Friday or Saturday. I don't mind as long as you are all right, perhaps I am rather childish, but your letters are the greatest comfort I get.

Never mind if you have not a photo to send Mrs. Lanyon, a letter will do just as well. It's Westbourne Terrace I think, will ask Mary when I go to Coombe if I don't forget.

I am glad to know the difference in the time there and here, so when it's six o'clock in the morning with you it's twelve o'clock noon with us. Will you be likely to see your friend Shenton sometimes? Is Russell very far from Grand River?

I don't think Stephen Tabb is very nice, neither is Jim Searle. I can't tell you the sense of things at all for I don't know. I do think it would have been better if Jim Searle had remained in California, he is too near to be honest I am afraid.

So thankful to know you are having a good time and beginning to feel a little more at home. I do sincerely hope you will soon find you have some good and true friends where you are. Glad to know the people like your preaching and they thought you had been to Palestine, "fancy" I suppose you made things out very plain in preaching, it's fine to be able to do it.

Of course you were very pleased to sit and hear another preach, a nice change. You conduct the service where you are just as we do in England.

Perhaps they are going to pay you your salary once a month. They appear to wish you to like it well enough to stop with them. You speak of visiting the people and stopping over night at some of the places. I should think you are doing pretty well with one and the other. The Jacksons you think are fine people. Mrs. J reminds you of Mrs. Lobb. I hope she is just as good as Mrs. Lobb and that you will get to feel at home with her and her husband. I remember the Campbells, you stopped with them the first few days you were in Grand River. It's nice for people to wish you to come again when you have once visited them.

Hope you will soon find a suitable horse for your work.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

June 8 - 08

Dear Dick

Hope you have got the post card all right that I sent you last week.

Your letter May 22 has come all right, never mind if they don't always come the same day of the week, I don't think I expect that.

Your private letter has come all right am glad to get it. So you have been staying with Sipherd's people at a farm near town and made some gates, I dare say a little exercise like that will do you good. I suppose you need not study so very much now, at any rate not like you have done in the past.

Am glad Sipherd's people are so friendly and good to you, and you do not have to be paying board when you are out like that. You seem to be very comfortable with the folks at Beconsfield I am thankful it's so.

Perhaps Grand River people will be freer and more friendly as time goes on. I wonder why they are so stiff and cold, never mind my son you are sure to meet with all sorts.

It's very good of you Dick to think of Mother, you may send me a sovereign. I still have a little and could get some things I need, but father would wonder where I got the money from, so if you send me some it will be all right, send it direct here to me in my name for me to cash myself at our post office. I don't mind who knows it. I shall be glad for people here to know you are able to do it. Father never gives me a shilling for any kind of clothing, he only allows me 10/- a week for every thing. I must put by 2/6 weekly for rent. I must pay for all the coal, pay Mrs. Wilton for washing, 3d weekly for papers, then there are stamps, these things amount to more than half of the money. There is not 5/- per week for both of us, and out of this 5/- I must find lamp oil, candles, soap, soda and a great many little things besides that we can't do without in the way of housekeeping. I have told father plainly that I can't save any rent out of the money he gives me, so he knows now that he must take the rent from what there is put by, he used to give me a little more money, but for the last three months it's been brought back to 10/- the week. I think I have much to be thankful for that I have a little of my own to fall back on. I don't go short of food Dick, I get many little things for myself that he knows nothing about. I should be in a poor place if I had nothing of my own. I don't say much to him, I let it go. I find that is the best way. He is never going to alter, he will always be the same sort of man.

I may just as well tell you now what father is doing, he asked me the other day if I had told you and I said no. Well he is now working on the roads breaking stone. I felt it at first, but I don't mind so much now, it's good enough for him, he has brought himself to it, he quarrelled with Ralph and his men, they none of them liked to work with father, he wanted to be master over them all. When Ralph bought the yard and business he paid all the money except a few pounds for some little things after. I think it was about £12. Ralph asked father to wait a little while for that, he said all right I will. A few weeks went by, father and Ralph were falling out every day, then father asked him to pay up, and because he didn't pay at once he put him in Court for the money, so Ralph sacked father at once when he knew what he had done. Father wouldn't listen to me nor any one, he would do it. Then he went down to Court Mill to work but that was against the law. Father signed a paper that he would not set up another saw mill in the parish or have anything to do with a saw mill business, he says he signed it without reading the paper, it was more binding than he thought so he was obliged to leave Court Mill again. He couldn't get any thing to do but break stone, he does not tell me how much he is getting. I know it's more than he gives me. I suppose if you had not asked me what father was doing I should say nothing about it for I did not wish to trouble you in any way. You know pretty well what father is like. You must ask me on a letter direct to tell you what father is doing before you comment on it.

So a lady at Beconsfield rather complimented you the other day, rather hard on the United Bretheren Minister though. They must not flatter you too much. I am very thankful you are able to do as you do. How pleased and glad I am to know that you have got the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. I know you have worked very hard for it, and now you are rewarded. Indeed you have a lot to be thankful for my son. Am glad you have got such a beautiful horse, hope it will do well. I don't know of any thing I wish you to send me by F. Varcoe, my son. I don't know if I have fully answered your letters or not, ask me any questions, I will try to answer them.

Love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

July 13 - 08

Dear Dick

Yours of the first came this morning.

I hope with you that the report is true concerning the penny postage to America.

I dare say you have some studying for the conference work, and your sermons I know must take a lot of time and a deal of thought to get them up as you wish.

Am so glad you have found your rain coat again.

Private letter came all right. I am willing enough to tell you what Father is doing but I thought it such a "come down," he has gone on through life as though he could conquer every body and do as he liked, but he is mistaken, he used to drive a carriage with four horses, now we haven't even a donkey. I can look back and see how we have come down step by step for so many long years. I used sometimes to say to him what I was afraid it would come to, then he would get vexed and say what is the good of your "old fore thoughts." These are the very words he has said to me, he would also say, I am going to have it today if I have nothing tomorrow.

Is it manly? Is it like anyone in his right mind to talk so? I never could get him to put by a shilling for old age or sickness. Only a very short time ago he said "I don't care who goes short as long as I have got it."  I never felt like that in my life. Father is the same sort of man he used to be Dick. I don't say much to him when he is cross. I think I have learnt a lesson that way, he is very much more unhappy than I am I can tell you and I get little things for myself that he knows nothing about. I think sometimes our Heavenly Father knows all about it. He cannot make a mistake.

You see my son I am going older all the time and I think at times I only want myself to do for, father makes a lot of work for me. I can walk if I take my time better than I can work, however I feel pretty well since the summer came I am thankful to say. I will find out if I can change a "five dollar bill" in a bank. I will see Grenville. It will be all right sending by F. Varcoe.

No Dick don't on any account say how much money you have on your letters that come straight home for it’s quite likely father would take undue advantage of it, he is not to be trusted I am sorry to say. So glad you have a little by you, tell me any thing. I feel so thankful for your kind thoughts of me. God will reward you.

I haven't quite answered your private letter now, but I wish to post this before father comes.

Love from Mother

C.Y.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

August 3 - 08

Dear Dick

Yours of July the 20 to hand.

Have seen Fred Varcoe he looks well. I was glad to see him coming straight from you, it was next to seeing you myself, he did speak well of you, said you were very comfortably fixed, said what a delightfully fine time you had together for six days. He has promised to come again and stop to tea, he only stopped a few minutes. I want to see and hear more. I suppose he is with Janie Martin most of the time. I hope they will be happy together.

Thanks for the little things you sent home and many thanks for the money. Father says I must thank you for the silk handkerchief. The little cream glass with Grand River on it is very pretty. I have not seen the children yet since I received the little things. Mary I expect will be home in a few days. Blanche and Frank I dare say will be up to the feast tomorrow. We are having splendid weather, quite hot. I have found Tom Hood's poems and some other books I will send. I think father will let you have the Commentary all right, I will get your stamp album up from Coombe. You sent home some stamps a year or two ago, you can have them back. Am glad you don't want the big family Bible for father sold it some months ago. "Pilgrim's Progress," also "Cook's Voyages," I intend to hand over to Mary to keep some day. The Prince of the House of David I send you to keep for my sake. I think it’s a nice book, it’s old but it’s all there.

Fred will manage about the books all right he says, I need not get a box to put them in.

I hope your horse will get on all right again in a few weeks. Am glad you like saddle riding it's good healthy exercise.

Tomorrow is the "Horse Show" as usual in Mr. Varcoe's field just by the Rectory. Wednesday will be the "Band of Hope" tea and Flower Show, fine times for some people I suppose. I shall have to go out with Blanche and Frank, they are grown to big children now. There are a great many carriages gone by today for Newquay. I like it to be fine weather on Bank Holiday for the young people to enjoy themselves.

We had a good preacher last evening, chapel very full, Band of Hope services.

Heads of corn and cotton pads very nice.

From your Loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

August 25 - 08

Dear Dick

Yours of the 11 to hand. I should like to see a little more of Fred Varcoe very much. I want to ask him more questions. I do hope I shall have a chance to see him again before he goes back to America, he promised to come and take tea with us but I don't know if he will now or not for he is going to be married next week I am told.

Yes my son I can see much better with my new glasses, am so glad I have got them. I don't sew or read very long at a time, eyesight is precious. I can't tell you Dick how thankful I feel when you write and tell me I am not to go short of any thing I need. I thank God for good children. Father doesn't seem to think of my wants in the least it's all self with him. I don't mind so much what he is like, I am not afraid I am going to want. He is still working stone breaking, to hear him sometimes anyone would almost think he was in a dying state if they didn't know him.

Mary appears to be in good health. I believe the change has done her good, and dear baby I think he will get on, he is out of doors a good deal and he has every thing in the way of food to help him. I was so glad you wrote about the importance of a plenty of fresh air both outdoors and in for Sundays. When father is at home he won't allow me to have a door open and in the evenings the same, he shuts the doors as soon as he comes in. We have had some hot weather too this summer. I can bear the heat as well as most people if I have nothing to do but when I am cooking and busy I need air. Of course father read your letter as usual but he passed no remarks, he has not said a word about the money you sent me either, if you had sent it to him it would have been all right. I am telling you these little things Dick for I thought you would like to know just how things are.

Am so glad you get on so well with a saddle horse. You have been with people called Jennings and have had a pleasant time. I have heard fried rabbit is very good. Father is very fond of rabbit he brings home a good many.

I suppose you are looking forward to the Conference. You won't know until then if you will be removed or not.

Am glad you have got a new bookcase.

The card with a Beconsfield advertisement has come all right.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

January 18 - 09

Dear Dick

Your letter came early this time.

I hope you had a good time with Bro. Cox at Cambria. You have a high regard for him and like him. I should suppose that he feels just the same towards you or he would not be likely to send for you to help him in his revival meetings. When you were very young Dick I never thought you would be a preacher much more an evangelist, people greatly change you see as time goes on. It's what I always thought I should like you to be, "A Minister." Yet I did not expect you would be for you appeared to be too quiet and retiring but I am very thankful it's as it is. I sincerely hope there is a happy useful life before you.

I am glad you get a new one sometimes, added to your church. The wife of the druggist. I am sorry about her husband and three other men getting into trouble about the liquor. How foolish of them.

How good of Alfred Yeoman and his wife to send you a Xmas pudding and such a nice post card you received with it. They must be true hearted people I am sure.

You remember I dare say that I used to pay to the Nursing association, I did so for years. Well I suppose it was two years ago father said it should be stopped. Mrs. Gilbert collects for Church Town, he wrote to her himself and said we were going to stop paying to it so of course I had to give in as usual. Now I have made up my mind to be a member again, father knows you send me a present now and then so I shall do as I like in this matter. You can mention it for father to see if you like, he said back at the time if he were taken ill he should have a Doctor and the rest I could do, so there was no need to pay to the nurse, you see I must never want her. Last week I caught my foot against a little hassock here in the kitchen and fell. The pain I suffered in that foot all of one night I can't tell you, it kept me from sleeping. I was scarcely able to get about for days, it's much better now but not quite well. Nurse might have helped me greatly if I could have sent for her but I had to do the best I could without her. It was only two shillings a year that I used to pay, some pay more of course. We never know what we may want. There will be a few pounds from Aunt Higman sometime, it won't be much but it will make me a little more independent.

[The final pages of Charlotte's letter are missing.]

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

May 25 -09

Dear Dick

Yours of the 10 came in good time.

My Father was only 64 when he died, he died of a fever, he was a strong healthy man before.

So you had a funeral again the other day, it was well this man had joined a lodge so that his wife had something to settle up things with. Perhaps your friend Mrs. Kerrs will live after all, it's to be hoped so.

Your Probationers class go in for lots of things I think, I have nothing to say against it, I think it's very pleasant to meet at a home and have a social of an evening as you do. So you won the contest on the letter C and gained the pretty little sea shell. I am so fond of sea shells. I well remember when a girl, I with others used to put a shell to our ear, by doing so we imagined we could hear the sea roar. I suppose it was only fancy. I dare say the coloured preacher went on all right.

Do you know where Rochester is? My Father's brother died there in 1875, he left a family one son and three daughters. The son is called Harrison Thomas of course.

I went to Coombe yesterday. I have got the two bills to change. I may go to St. Austell on Friday. I could have had them last week but I did not go to Coombe. Mary is very much obliged for the dollar and I am obliged too shall get on grand now.

I received a letter from Aunt Ellen this morning. She is very glad you are getting on so well.

I think Catherine will have a good living. She was very much concerned the other day because there is no will. She has had advice. I hope things will be settled before long. She sent for me this morning to come down to see her to tell me that it was better than she feared.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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Richard's first church at Grand River, Iowa.

This small frame church of wooden construction later burned down.

On the back of the card Richard has written:

This is the church and parsonage at G. R. The small buildings to the right are just outside the churchyard. The garden is behind the parsonage building. The little door at the rear of the church is a little coal house stuck up against the church. There is one bell up in the tower. You see the front door of parsonage to the left, and a part of the porch over the side door. I usually come out of the side door when I go to the church. There is another door behind. My room is on the left hand corner. The window is hidden by a small tree. The two windows you see are in the parlor.

 

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Richard with his ponies

On the back of this card Richard has written:

For Blanche

This is myself and the ponies. Kittie in my right hand, Billie in my left.

 

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Pastors' Window, in a Methodist church, Grand River, Iowa.

When Richard Yelland graduated from Drew Seminary in Madison, New Jersey, his first assignment was to Grand River, Iowa. The small frame church he preached in burned down about 1910, and the larger brick church with the tall stained glass windows was built after 1911. The eight names on the window are of the pastors who had preached in the smaller frame church:

 

                                       W.B. COX.                             GEO. E. MITCHELL

                                       W. O. WOOLEVER.              T. M. BUTTERFIELD

                                       CHAS. C. WILKINS.             R. R. YELLAND

                                       W. C. SMITH.                        CHAS. KNOLL.

.

This photograph was taken when Richard's daughter, Mary, visited the church in 2001. Mary was then aged 90.

 

The Reverend W. B. Cox had married Richard and Fannie in 1909.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

July 5 - 09

Dear Dick

Your letter of June 22 to hand.

I thought perhaps you did not get quite so much cabbage as we do in England. You get other good things. There is more fruit with you. I dare say this sweet corn is nice, you sent me home one ear by Fred Varcoe but I keep it to look at, I do not want to eat it. We have lettuce in the garden, father likes it I don't care for it. I believe it's healthy eating. The strawberries and cream I could go in for very well. I have had some nice ones this season "by the quiet." I suppose they are nearly done now, I may get a few more.

So you attended the District Conference at Corydon? Am glad you had a very enjoyable time. I dare say the speakers were fine. The Bishop who ordained you last fall, I remember the name. It's so nice for you to have these little changes and see other towns, it will do you good. How lovely to have so many trees in the town. Very glad you have sent the picture of the Methodist Church. I like it. You have had a wedding again, send on all such little news.

Now my dear son it is my wish for you to use the money you have by you as you think fit, you need not take the trouble to tell me all about it. I know you are careful, have every thing you can to make you comfortable. I would rather you did so, I don't think Dick it would be wise for you to come home yet. I want you to get ahead first, you can't do it all at once, it certainly would be nice if you could come home often, but never mind. People are kind and good to you so I can get on all right. The little extras you get are useful, am glad you are gaining a little. You need not send me any money at present

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

August 23/09

Dear Dick

Yours of the 9 came this morning. I was out waiting to see the post, fully expecting a letter sometimes, lately it has come on the Friday or Saturday, if not then. I always think to get it on the Monday morning. I think the hay is pretty well got in. I don't think it's hurt much.

We have had a lot of rain again the last day or two. The farmers need dry weather now for the corn if they could get it. Am glad you are getting good harvest weather.

Father worked for Sam Martyn four days I can't tell when he is likely to get anything more to do.

You use little traction engines to thresh the corn. People have done some threshing here already. Still there is a lot of corn not cut yet. So you are on the move a little preaching in other churches and in the park. Your ponies must be going on well lovely little things they must look fine two going side by side. Am glad the people listened attentively and seemed to be pleased.

I remember the name Bro. Cox I think you helped him in revival meetings last winter.

You stayed with people called Evans very nice people. I expect you meet with some very intelligent folks as you move around.

It's evening, I think the rain has stopped so will get ready to go up and post this letter.

With love from Mother

C. Yelland

 

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M.[ethodist] E.[piscopal] Church - New Virginia, Iowa

Sept. 27/09

Dear Mother,

                 Please address all mail to this place now. This is a picture of my new church. It is a brick building. Cost about $8000.00(eight thousand dollars). Preached here yesterday first time, and got on alright.

Dick

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

October 4/09

Dear Dick

Your letter from Ames has come in good time. I suppose you have had your letters forwarded to you. I expect you have had a pretty comfortable time at Conference, I dare say it would be tiresome to sit through every session.

You have had a chance to hear good sermons and addresses at any rate. Am glad you were entertained by very nice people. So you have been doing a little reporting work. I expect you liked that very well whether you are paid or not.

You have received credit for all examination work that is fine, something to be thankful for I am sure. Next year if all be well you hope to get off light. I dare say you feel good over that.

The Hale College you speak of must be beautiful I should think, trees make a place look lovely it must be very large indeed and so much land attached to it for all kinds of experiments, it must have been very pleasant for you to meet that young man Frank Klippel. I hope you will be able to visit his friends, he is a little younger than you.

I suppose I shall know when your next letter comes if you are leaving Grand River, you think it will be a little better charge, you will soon find friends. You will be nearer Des Moines the capital. I hope you will get through any way.

The college chimes I should think must be lovely. The boys you say play them by hand. I expect they enjoy it, nice little change for them. I went to St. Austell last Friday, Uncle and Aunt are gone into another house just by. They have sold their property expect to have the money paid down in two or three weeks. Now my son you can soon have the £150, hope the investment will be safe, shall want you to send me some interest every quarter. You must say how and where I shall send it.

From Mother

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

October 19/09

Dear Dick

Your letters are both come. The one to our address also one to Mrs. Jennings. I must confess I felt a little surprised when I read your letter to see that you were about to be married, but last week when you wrote about visiting folks by the name of Evans and said I should hear more about them soon it set me thinking. I thought I wonder if there is a daughter there that he cares for, so you see I thought right for once. Well my son you know you have my best wishes and prayers for you both and I feel I have got another good worthy daughter and I hope and trust you will be happy and comfortable all through life. I am so thankful you have a nice home to take your bride to, I think you must have a lovely place.

Fannie has a nice family of brothers and sisters also father and mother both living very nice.

Am glad you are going to visit Klippel's folks for your wedding trip. It is very satisfying to know the people are pleased with your preaching.

Uncle has got the money all ready for you, most likely it will be sent on next week. I will try to go to St. Austell if the weather is fit and tell him about it. Make it right Dick for Mary to have half if I don't live to need it all.

Still let me have a private letter sometimes. I have put this one in the fire.

The pictures you have sent are nice.

From your loving Mother

C. Yelland

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

Newspaper report of the marriage of Richard Yelland to Fannie Evans. October 20, 1909.

 

YELLAND-EVANS

 

At the home of the bride's parents, at eleven o'clock Wednesday, October 20, occurred the marriage of Rev. R. R. Yelland to Miss Fannie Evans, Rev. W. B. Cox officiating. Immediately after the ceremony the guests were invited into the dining room where awaited them a bounteous and well prepared dinner. Congratulations were postponed until after dinner. The only invited guests besides the immediate family were Mrs. Morley of Humeston and Mrs. W. B. Cox of Cambria.

Miss Evans is well known and highly esteemed by a wide circle of friends. She has been a teacher in the public schools of Wayne county for a number of years, having taught five years in the home school at Maple Grove. She is an active church worker, being at the time of her marriage Sunday school superintendent and church organist. She is eminently fitted to fill the place she is to occupy.

Mr. Yelland is an excellent young man and well equipped for his life's work. He is a graduate of Drew Theological Seminary and at present is pastor of the M. E. church at New Virginia. Rev. Yelland went into one of the best homes in the community to get his bride.

The happy couple took the afternoon train for a short visit to the northern part of the state. They will soon be settled in one of the best parsonages in southern Iowa. Their many friends wish them a happy and prosperous future.

 

Wedding photograph

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

November 2/09

Dear Dick

               Your letters have come all right, also post card, and the announcement card. Am glad the marriage ceremony went off all right. I thought perhaps Bro. Cox would marry you for I have heard you speak of him so many times as being a great friend of yours.

Am so glad you went to Brett and found the Klippels such nice homely people, it's nice that Fannie can make herself at home with folks it's no good to be stiff and unsociable. I always think the Americans are naturally more friendly than the English.

It's much to be thankful for my son to know that you have found a wife to help you do some of the visiting.

The Klippels are all nice you say, cousin Issie and Richard I like that. They are doing well for their children that is fine. Tell me anything like that, you know how father feels about any thing like that, he cannot bear for the children to know more than himself. Send them to work he says, for why should they stick up for gentlemen and ladies, but he can't have things all his way, you must tell Fannie just what father is like for I shall have to write you about little things some times. Mary went to St. Austell last Friday with me, sent you the money, it had to be sent to Des Moines, it cost me twenty one shillings and three pence to send it. I will say a little more when I write next. With love to you and Fannie.

From Mother

C. Yelland

[Enclosure]

Dear Fannie

I feel I must just write you a line.

A friend said to me the other day you have not lost a son but you have gained a daughter. I could not on any account afford to lose my Dick.

I hope to receive photos before very long, you will be taken together I suppose?

You will not be very far away from your friends, that is nice.

I suppose you never saw Cornish cream before. Mrs. Klippel made some, how did you like it? Also pasty.

I sincerely hope you will both be happy and comfortable together and have every thing around you nice.

From your Affectionate Mother

C.Y.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

November 16/09

Dear Dick

Your letter is come all right with a picture of Mason City, also a clipping from G R paper. You know my son I am always glad to receive any thing like that. I am sure you must have spent a very happy time with Fannie's folks at Maple Grove before going on to your charge at New Virginia.

I suppose this shivaree you write about is pretty much like the fun I get home here sometimes when young people get married, it won't hurt much. So the poor boys walked away quietly when you invited them in, that was rather too much for them.

I expect you had some thing to do to read over half dozen of my letters. I thought you would not be likely to see them while you were away.

Am glad it's all right about witnesses to prove your residence there for five years. Dabb's folks would do what they could for you I am sure. Shall you still keep your ponies?

Am glad friends have been giving presents. I would like to send something but can't very well just now.

That old silver spoon Dick is yours, hope you will have it some day.

Your private letter is come all right. I had the sign on the envelope so went and fetched it. You may trust Mrs. J all right.

I hope you have received the money by this time. I should have sent it by a draft on a London bank but I should have been obliged to go to town again in two or three days. That would not do, father would ask why I was going again so soon, and I wanted Mary to do it for me.

I hope you and Fannie will both go and see the land. I know you will do what you think is for the best. 30/- every quarter is what I wish you to send, that is what I have been receiving. I have not much more time to write now, I know you are very good Dick I can trust you. Keep nothing from Fannie be as one with each other.

I expect my son that I shall leave father very soon. I don't say much to him but he says a plenty to me. I shall go quietly and say nothing to him about what I am going to do, the sooner I go the better to please Mary. She thinks things are altogether too hard for me to bear. I am going older I can't stand it so well, he keeps me short of money for housekeeping and tells me to use my own, in two or three weeks I expect to get the few pounds that is willed to me from Aunt, father will want to take that from me or keep me short so that I shall be obliged to use it. A few weeks ago he would not allow me money to have proper food and when I asked him for a shilling he said use your own and I was obliged to do so, he buys things for himself that I cannot eat, he told me the other day I ought to be starved for a time then I should come to it. Uncle and Aunt have offered me a home in town with them, a nice bed room. They are anxious for me to leave and come with them. Don't trouble I think I have nearly enough to live on for a year if I am spared then my pension will come. Say more perhaps next time.

Love to you and wife

C. Yelland

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

November 23/09

Dear Dick

Glad to get your letter again today. You are getting some of the rooms fixed up. I expect they are looking nice, just such rooms as I would like.

Those heating stoves must be fine. You have no grates in the rooms like we have, and the doors are so arranged that one stove will heat three rooms. We do not have things like that home here.

So you helped Fannie to wash a little, I am glad you are trying to make yourself useful, sometimes help is needed, when you have a machine and a wringer they help so.

I know you like good cooking and now you have got it. It won't cost you a great deal to live while you are only two, vegetables and fruit I like better than so much meat, it will suit you I know. So Fannie does not like milk, well that is funny, be sure to get it for yourself. I should have to pay six cents for a quart home here. Apple sauce is very good. I don't know how to give receipt for Cornish pasty I am sure. Fannie can tell just how much pastry to make for two little pasties, rub in a little lard then roll it out very thin. Then put little pieces of lard all over it. Then well dredge it with flour and roll it up tight or fairly tight, let it stand for half an hour, put it into as many parts as you want, mould it just like a dumpling and roll it out for a pasty, that is how I used to do it for you. I think Fannie will get on after she has tried a few times. "Tuesday." It's a lovely morning today. I am going to try to go to Coombe, have been suffering in my head lately. I still think to go in with my sister before long. Love to you and Fannie.

From Mother

C.Y.

 

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1 Saw Mill Terrace

St. Stephens

November 30/09

Dear Dick

I will answer your letter another day. I hope soon to be in with Aunt Lizzie. Am putting things together, will tell you more about it next week if all is well. Address the next letter you write to me c/o Mrs. Parkin, South Street. I shall see Mrs. Jennings and if there should be a private letter she will send it on to me. I can't put up with father much longer. Sometimes I don't feel very well then I want a little kindness, with love to you and Fannie. Shall hear more very soon.

From Mother

C.Y.

Glad you received the letter that Aunt wrote.

 

(Charlotte went to live with her sister, Elizabeth Parkin (Aunt Lizzie) the following day, and was found dead two days later on December 3rd 1909. See newspaper account of inquest and copy of death certificate included in final pages. Ed.)

 

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708 N. Union St.

Stockton

Feb. 1910

My dear Nephew and Niece

Your letter received dated Jan. 2, 1910. I was pleased to hear from you. A few days ago I received a letter from cousin Klipple, she said that you had been at her home and she seemed pleased with your visit. She wrote me a nice long letter, she would like to have the picture of Court Mills. I have one, so I will send it to her.

I have not been well for some weeks, have had a bad cold, but I am thankful to say I am better now. I was sorry to hear of your dear Mother's death, gone so suddenly. I received a letter from your Father telling me of her death, it's very sad. Your Uncle Walter has been sick with a bad cold but is better now.

Alfred Yelland's sister has been to San-Francisco to see him. He will be through Dental College in May month, he is well.

I have received a letter from Arthur Yelland's wife, she said that her nephew, John Yelland died and left a wife and five children.

I am glad to hear that you are both so Happy and have such a nice home. I don't remember if I told you that last fall we built a new house on one of our Lots, we rent the house for 17 dollars a month.

I will close with love from your

Aff Aunt Ellen Tretheway

Shall be pleased to hear from you.

 

P.S. Walter and his family are well they have one girl Baby, they still live at Hollister.

       Nellie received a letter from you, she with her family are well.

E.T.

 

* * * * * * * * * *

 

The following is from a newspaper cutting referring to the death of Richard's aunt, Ellen Tretheway, who wrote the letter above.

At the top of the article Richard has written in shorthand: Stockton Record May 3rd 1910.

 

DEATH COMES AFTER STROKE

----------------

Mrs Ellen Tretheway Passed

Away at Noon

----------------

Noble Woman Who Will Be Sincerely

Mourned By Large Circle of Friends

-----------------

Mrs. Ellen Tretheway, wife of E. A. Tretheway and mother of Supervisor E. E. Tretheway, died at fifteen minutes past noon today, following a paralytic stroke which affected her right side on Sunday evening last. Since she was stricken Mrs. Tretheway had lain perfectly helpless, and it was only yesterday afternoon that she rallied sufficiently to make it known to members of the family that she recognised them. She was told that if she recognised those about her to raise her left hand, and she complied, but she could do no more.

Sunday evening last at the supper table Mrs. Tretheway was serving fruit. At the table was her husband, her son, E. E. Tretheway, and wife, and her cousin, Joseph Martyn. While in the act of raising a spoonful of peaches her hand fell helplessly into the fruit dish. She tried to raise it, but could not. The family then saw that something was wrong, and tenderly they laid the stricken wife and mother on her bed, from which she was destined to not arise alive. Drs. Arthur, Dameron and Friedberger were called in attendance, but they were powerless to do anything. The stroke, the physicians announced, was due to hemorrhage of the brain, and kidney trouble.

Mrs. Tretheway was a native of England, aged 69 years, 7 months and 21 days. She came to California in 1868, and soon thereafter made her home in Stockton, where she has since continuously resided. For thirty two years the family home has been at the corner of Park and Union Streets, prior to which the family lived for ten years on Miner Avenue, opposite St. John's church. She leaves a husband and four children - Edgar E. and Walter Y. Tretheway, Mrs. Nellie Grunsky and Mrs. Amy Zimmermann. Walter Tretheway, who resides at Hollister, was here on a visit while his mother was stricken.

Mrs. Tretheway was a noble woman, and many people will bear grateful tribute to her many acts of charity and kind ministrations. She was of sterling principle, devoted to truth and honesty and frankness. She was an active member of the Central Methodist Episcopal Church and a charter member of Lebanon Rebekah Lodge, No. 41, of which she was a constant attendant. She will be missed and sincerely mourned by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

The funeral service will be held Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

 

Newspaper cutting

 

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