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The early Yelland family of South Brent, Devon

 

    

 

This page is under construction (26 Jun 2010)

 Odd snippets will be pasted here and collated into coherent history later

 

Information from our own research, Winnifred Lee Yelland (Winnie Drum), USA and John Yolland, NZ

 

 

 

Part of the opening address given by John Yolland at a YOLLAND reunion in Ashburton in 2002.

Early origins

The Yolland name has early Devon origins, with a number of variations appearing in early records. For example “Yoldlande” is recorded at the 1220 Assize, and “Oldelande” was noted in a record from 1330. The name is thought to be Old English for “a dweller on the old slope land”, which I think is consistent with our knowledge that the family, back at least to the 1400’s, were prosperous Yeoman farmers, possibly on the lower slopes of Dartmoor. Even in the 1500’s the name is spelt variously Yolande, Yeoland, Yeollond, Yallond, and Yalland with our particular family also known alternatively by their alias Welbroke. It is likely that this latter name is associated with a location, perhaps the Wella Brook on Dartmoor.

There is still a Yolland Farm, although now appearing spelt Yalland on current maps, just a mile or so north of the town of South Brent. William Crossing’s book “Guide to Dartmoor” published about 1910, refers to Yolland Farm and the nearby cross road as “Yolland Cross”, There is also an area close by on the moor identified as “Yolland Warren”.

 

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There are Yolland and Welbrooke families recorded in South Brent in the 1525 Lay Subsidy and a Robert YOLLELOND is listed in the Lay Subsidy of 1332. A Roger Yolland is listed as a Pikeman in the 1569 Muster Roll.

 

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In the top left of this map is Yalland Farm, South Brent

 

3 miles away (in the top right) is Yelland Farm, Rattery

 

Click on the links to see satellite maps, Street View and photographs

 

 

In this larger scale map Wellabrook Girt and Western Wella Brook are in the top left corner and Yalland Farm, Yalland Cross and Yalland Warren about 3 miles away in the bottom right corner.

 

 

 

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From John Yolland:

A Portrait of South Brent p.3

Source: A Portrait of South Brent (no date), Gregory Wall, P.D.S Printers, Plymouth.

 

“The Cairn on Eastern Whitabarrow was mentioned as part of the forest boundary by the perambulators of 1240, thence to Wobroovefoot-Drylake-Crefeildfford or Dryefeild –Knattleborough-Wester Wellebrooke Head- thence by Western Wellabroke to Aune or Aven-Easter  Whitaburrowe-Redlake….”

 

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From John Yolland:

Petre Survey Book E31, 1564-1566

Source: Devon Record Office 123M-E31

 

John predyanpe Sargeant at Lawe John Rudywaye and Thomas Willyams Esquires Comyssioned appointed wth others for the vewe and true setting forth of the borde betwixt the Qwenes Matl forrest of Dartmore and the said pasture or common called Brent more belonging to the Manure of the Sowthe Brent in the Countie of devon (As by a comyssion therof to them dysected bering teste the second daye of Auguste in the mth and vth yeres of the Raignes of or lat souvaigne lord and ladye kinge phillipp and Qwene Marye  ^ maye appese ) Have returned thanswer of the payd comysson  into the Qwenes Maties Exchequere before the Barons therof the xxvth daye of the sayd  moneth of August in the sayd mth & vth yeres As herafter ensueth, Sidelt predicta  mora sen vastw de Brentmore se extendit ascenden a quadm valle sen loco quodm vbi et in quo due aque vocat ler glazes somull concurrent in vumm et ab to loco se extendit versne boream vsp ad capite de Elase, et a capite de Elase ulteame se extendit asceden versne boream p quandum longam Conger Lapidium vocab le Rowe Rewe, usqr ad quendum magna Congerim lapidum nominee Triberiboroughe als Treboroughe existen medict congeriem de tribr conger lapidum ibm, & a predict medict Conger Lapidn predict mora sen vastn vocat brentmore, se extendit versne boream  p vastn de Uggboroughe als Uggboroughe moore contigne adiacen usqr ad ulteriorem Whyteboroughr als dict Wester Whyteboroughe, Adqm quidem ul  Whiteboroughe al dict Wester Whyteboroughe foresta de dertmore predict in borealis xx adiacet & ab eodm ulterion Whyteborough sen wester whiteborough, predicta mora de Brent, vocat Brent more se extendit verse orent p foresta de dartmore predict usqr ad vadum de Buckland vocat buckland forde xxe  busshoppe meade als busshe meadow Et a Bucklande forde predict, predicta morade Brent more se extendit decenden p foresta predicta ut aqua de Avenn comrrat,  usqr  ad Welbroke foote, et a Welbroke foote predict, predicta mora  sine vastn vocat brent more,  se extendit  verse orintem p Aven predict usqr ad smalbroke foote, ad quem locum vocat Welbroke fot, predca mora de Brent, vocat Brentmore et quedm alia mora vocat Buckfastleigh more circumiavent  prefat foresta de dartmore etc. /.

 

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Found on the internet:

 

 

 

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From one of the many internet “Coat of Arms” sites:

 

 

 

The surname of YELLAND was a locational name 'of Yealand' a township in the parish of Warton, County Lancashire, and the name of several places in Devon and Cornwall. The name was derived from the Old English word 'hea-land', the dweller on the high land. Cornish naming practices are unfortunately poorly documented for the Middle Ages, but present day Cornish surnames, somewhat surprisingly, do not follow the predominantly patronymic pattern of the other Celtic languages, including Welsh. This may be attributed to the greater influence of the English bureaucracy and English naming practices in Cornwall than in Wales at the time when surnames came into use. The majority of Cornish names are habitation names and others are derived from medieval given names. Early records of the name mention John de la Yaldelonde, 1273, County Devon. Willemus de Yeland of Yorkshire was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. During the Middle Ages, when people were unable to read or write, signs were needed for all visual identification. For several centuries city streets in Britain were filled with signs of all kinds, public houses, tradesmen and even private householders found them necessary. This was an age when there were no numbered houses, and an address was a descriptive phrase that made use of a convenient landmark. At this time, coats of arms came into being, for the practical reason that men went into battle heavily armed and were difficult to recognise. It became the custom for them to adorn their helmets with distinctive crests, and to paint their shields with animals and the like. Coats of arms accompanied the development of surnames, becoming hereditary in the same way. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to become fixed at around the 12th century, and have developed and changed slowly over the years. As society became more complex, and such matters as the management of tenure, and in particular the collection of taxes were delegated to special functionaries, it became imperative to distinguish a more complex system of nomenclature to differentiate one individual from another. The name has many variant spellings which include Yelland, Yeoland and Yolland
Arms recorded in the Cornish Armory.

 

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John Yolland has a copy of the following land lease sale:

 

26 November, 32 Hen. VIII, 1540

SOUTH BRENT.  Bargain and sale by John Yeolland, alias Welbroke, to William Whyting of a close of land called Crecrosse in Aysshe in Brent. John Feres and John Morysshed appointed attorneyas

 

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